Final War on Jupiter

Front Cover
AuthorHouse, 2010 - Fiction - 340 pages
0 Reviews
An emperor's report--in his own words Final War On Jupiter is written by Sagwind IV, emperor of Ramosan, Jupiter. Sagwind IV was appointed Supreme Warlord of the Allied Forces for the Preservation of Jupiterian Civilization, in the war with Godosan--a war which shook an entire planet. This is his very personal report on that expedition. Final War On Jupiter is the concluding volume of the trilogy, The Chronicles of Jupiter. Book I was War On Jupiter by Lieutenant Nublander. Book II was Brains Ought Not to Be Overworked by Wrinklebonk. All three books were translated from the original Jupiterian, and edited for American audiences, by Carl Wells.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

I First Hear of Final War
1
At the Trekak Races
13
Smedwich Meets Someone Interesting
23
Allobanquars Plans
33
Smedwich Makes an Afternoon Visit
39
Barnsniffs Return from Arnosan
45
Our Letter to Godosan
55
Dining at Escodinos
63
Peace of Godosan the War Begins
181
The Second Attack and Immediately After
193
I Consult Another Advisor
207
Among the Wounded
215
With Ranward
223
Hendaddle
229
Organizing Our Return
237
Smedwich Wounded and Another Wounded Man
241

Her Ladyship Sparkanette
69
Our Letter Arrives in Godosan
77
Ranwards Letter to Us
87
The Godosan Priests Talk to Us
101
The Expedition Sails Ill Chapter 14 Sailing Days With a Birthday Interruption
119
Not a Routine Sailing Day
127
A Somewhat Surprising Issue and a Further Surprise
137
We Hear From Godosan and Reply
149
Our Western Allies
161
Hendaddle Speaks
175
In Godosan
249
A Stop on the Way to Ramosan
259
Allobanquar Does Something Intelligent
275
Where is Smedwich?
281
Barnsniff
291
Barrenbolts Barn
301
Final Reflections
313
Footnotes
319
Getting In Touch With the Author
323
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2010)

Carl Wells, translator and editor of Final War On Jupiter, lives in the hills of southern Indiana.

Bibliographic information