Fingering the Jagged Grain: Tradition and Form in Recent Black Fiction

Front Cover
University of Georgia Press, Aug 1, 2010 - Literary Criticism - 322 pages
0 Reviews

In Fingering the Jagged Grain, Keith E. Byerman discusses how black writers such as Toni Morrison, Ishmael Reed, and Ernest Gaines have moved away from the ideological rigidity of the black arts movement that arose in the 1960s to create a more expressive, imaginative, and artistic fiction inspired by the example of Ralph Ellison's Invisible Man. Combining a strong concern for technique and craftsmanship with elements of African American heritage including jazz, blues, spirituals, cautionary tales, and voodoo, these writers have created a vital fiction that celebrates the strength and resilience of the black American voice as it recounts the painful details and brutal episodes of black experience.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

11
11
41
41
Three
104
Four
171
Five
217
238
238
Conclusion
275
Notes
281
Bibliography
289
Index
303
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2010)


Keith E. Byerman is a professor of English at Indiana State University. He is the author or editor of six books including Remembering the Past in Contemporary African American Fiction and Seizing the Word: History, Art, and Self in the Work of W. E. B. Du Bois (Georgia).

Bibliographic information