First Do No Harm: Law, Ethics and Healthcare

Front Cover
Professor Sheila A M McLean
Ashgate Publishing, Ltd., Feb 28, 2013 - Law - 622 pages

This collection brings together essays from leading figures in the field of medical law and ethics which address the key issues currently challenging scholars in the field. It has also been compiled as a lasting testimony to the work of one of the most eminent scholars in the area, Professor Ken Mason. The collection marks the academic crowning of a career which has laid one of the foundation stones of an entire discipline. The wide-ranging contents and the standing of the contributors mean that the volume will be an invaluable resource for anyone studying or working in medical law or medical ethics.

 

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Contents

1 The Legitimacy of Medical Law
1
2 Cases and Casuistry
17
Hippocratic and Democratic Ideals
29
4 Contemporary Challenges in the Regulation of Health Practitioners
39
A New Paradigm for Global Health Governance?
59
From Ethics to Law
81
7 Ethical and Policy Issues Related to Medical Error and Patient Safety
101
What Place for the Public Good?
117
20 Is There a Right Not to Procreate?
319
A Shield or a Sword?
337
The Case for Decriminalising Abortion Laws in Australia
353
23 Whats Love Got to Do With It? Regulating Reproductive Technologies and Second Hand Emotions
369
24 Saviour Siblings
389
Some Further Complications
407
26 LifeProlonging Treatment and Patients Legal Rights
421
The Law and Politics of Assisted Nutrition and Hydration
431

Reflections on the Rise and Rise of Patient Choice in Contemporary Medical Law
131
10 Conceptualising Privacy in Relation to Medical Research Values
151
Why Patients Participate in Clinical Trials
165
12 Humans as Medicines
187
Safeguarding Altruism and Trust
203
14 Law Reform Clinical Research and Adults without Mental Capacity Much Needed Clarification or a Recipe for Further Uncertainty?
215
15 Continuing Conundrums in Competency
235
Sayonara Sub Silentio Sidaway?
255
17 Informed Consent to Medical Treatment and the Impotence of Tort
273
Some Problems Concerning the Dead and the Incompetent when it Comes to Consent
287
19 No More Shock Horror? The Declining Significance of Sudden Shock and the Horrifying Event in Psychiatric Injury Claims
303
28 Euthanasia as a Human Right
447
29 The Futility of Opposing the Legalisation of NonVoluntary and Voluntary Euthanasia
461
30 Defending the Council of Europes Opposition to Euthanasia
479
SocioEthical Implications
495
32 The Do No Harm Principle and the Genetic Revolution in New Zealand
511
33 Cloning Zoning and the Harm Principle
527
The Erasure of Animal Bodies in Healthcare Law
543
35 Is the Gender Recognition Act 2004 as Important as It Seems?
561
36 The Positive Side of Healthcare Rights
573
37 In Defence of Doctors
587
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About the author (2013)

Professor McLean is the first holder of the International Bar Association Chair of Law and Ethics in Medicine at Glasgow University and is Director of the Institute of Law and Ethics in Medicine at Glasgow University.

Contributors: Sheila McLean, Sandy McCall Smith, Jonathan Montgomery, Robin Downie, Ian Freckleton, Lawrence Gostin, Don Chalmers, Gerard Magill, Veronica English, Rebecca Mussell, Julian Sheather, Ann Somerville, Graeme Laurie, Deryck Beylefeld, Pamela Ferguson, Margot Brazier, Alastair Campbell, Jean McHale, John Devereux, David Meyers, Emily Jackson, John Harris, Harvey Teff, Elaine Sutherland, Bernard Dickens, Kerry Petersen, Penelope Beem, Derek Morgan, Michael Freeman, Soren Holm, Loane Skene, Tom Campbell, Len Doyal, John Keown, Denise Avard, Linda Kharaboyan, Bartha Knoppers, Mark Henaghan, Roger Brownsword, Kenneth Norrie, Christopher Newdick, Vivienne Harpwood.

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