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Newson & Co., 1913 - English language - 278 pages
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I picked this book up at a rummage sale. Absolutely delightful! While it was written in 1913, it brought me back to my own third grade experience in reading and writing, probably about 1943. It's a wonderful experience in reading for pleasure, learning grammar, and exercising imagination. A perfect primer for making the transition from rote to comprehension. The book was originally accompanied by a teacher's guide, which was probably unnecessary, since the method is essentially self-taught. The book is divided into stories, musings, poems, and fairy tales, with a decidedly victorian bent. The full page picture panels are so romantic, catching the essence of the era. Especially for anyone who is graying, this will bring pleasant memories of a different time. I treasure my colored/scribbled and annotated copy of this great schoolbook. 

Contents

Games of Description
21
The Mountain and the Squirrel R W Emerson 2i XIV Telling the Story of the Poem
24
CHAPTER II
25
Studying the Story
27
Conversation and Dramatizing
30
Telling True Stories
31
Sentences Capitals and Periods
32
Using Capitals and Periods
35
Unstudied Dictation
36
Riddles
38
Answering Riddles
39
Picture Stories
40
SECTION PAGE XIV More Picture Stories
43
Telling True Stories
44
Spring Waking Isabel E Mackay
46
Part Reading and Dramatizing
50
Oral Reproductions
51
CHAPTER III
52
Dramatizing the Story
55
Writing Questions about the Story
57
How Titles are Written
58
Copying the Story The Trees and the Wood cutter
59
Titles to Copy
60
Writing Titles from Dictation 6i X Giving Titles to Pictures 6i XI Picture Stories
61
More Picture Stories
62
Telling True Stories
66
Writing a Story
67
Writing a Stanza from Memory
69
CHAPTER IV
71
Their and There
73
Writing the Story of the Four Oxen
75
A Story to Study
76
The Game of Names
77
Dictation
78
Dictation
80
Enlarging a Story for Dramatizing
82
More Picture Stories
86
The First Bluebell 4 Poem
88
The Story in the Poem
90
CHAPTER V
91
Studying the Story
95
Conversation and Dramatizing
98
Telling the Story The Little White Flower
99
Copying the Story
103
Dictation i04 VIII A Story to Finish
104
Writing the Ending of a Story
105
Words that can be used in Place of Said
106
Questions for You i08 XII Picture Stories
108
More Picture Stories
110
The Chestnut Bur Christine H Hamilton ii3 XV Memorizing the Poem
116
CHAPTER VI
117
Copying
120
The Little Red Hen Part II
121
Writing from Dictation
122
Where to use Capital Letters
124
Writing a Conversation in Dialogue Form 132
132
Picture Stories
133
Unstudied Dictation i53 IX When the Little Boy Ran Away A Poem
153
Dramatizing the Poem i59 XI Writing a Dialogue
159
The Lost Boy a story to finish
160
A Picture Story
162
Writing a Story i65 XV More Picture Stories
165
More Stories to Write
169
A Fairy Wish
170
CHAPTER VIII
171
Studying a Fable
174
Writing a Fable from Dictation i76 IV Telling Original Fables
176
Writing an Original Fable
179
Dramatizing The Wise Judge
185
Writing a Story from a Dialogue i88 X Picture Stories
188
More Picture Stories
191
Little Blue Pigeon Eugene Field i93 XIII Copying the Poem
194
Memorizing the Poem
199
CHAPTER IX
200
A Copying Lesson
204
The Months and their Abbreviations
205
Holidays
206
My Birthday
207
How the Months were Named
208
Writing about the Months 2i0 XI Quotations about the Months
210
Memorizing a Quotation
217
Picture Stories
218
More Picture Stories
220
Studied Dictation
223
CHAPTER X
224
Studying the Story
227
Dramatizing the Story
230
Why Marks of Punctuation are used
231
A Fable to Study and Copy
233
Writing from Dictation
234
Writing Original Fables
236
SECTION PAGE X Contractions
237
A Contraction that is always Wrong
238
The Exclamation Mark
240
Writing Exclamations
242
The Dumb Soldier R L Stevenson
244
The Lost Doll Charles Kingsley
248
Writing Stories from Poems
249
Writing True Stories
250
CHAPTER XI
251
Writing a Story from an Outline
252
The Kings Dream A Story from India
253
Dramatizing The Kings Dream
256
Dates
257
Writing Dates from Dictation
258
Toms Letter Continued
262
Tom answers his Letter
264
Writing a Letter to a Friend
265
Writing the Fable from Dictation
266
Writing a Fable
268
America S F Smith
270
Writing America from Memory
274
CHAPTER XII
276
Copyright

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Page 269 - tis of thee, Sweet land of liberty, Of thee I sing; Land where my fathers died, Land of the pilgrims' pride, From every mountain side, Let freedom ring!
Page 269 - My native country, thee, Land of the noble free, — Thy name I love; I love thy rocks and rills, Thy woods and templed hills ; My heart with rapture thrills Like that above.
Page 140 - You are up in Papa's big bedroom, In the chest with the queer old key!" And she said: "You are warm and warmer; But you're not quite right,
Page 277 - There was an old woman who lived In a shoe, She had so many children, she didn't know what to do.
Page 138 - IT was an old, old, old, old lady, And a boy that was half-past three; And the way that they played together Was beautiful to see. She couldn't go running and jumping, And the boy, no more could he; For he was a thin little fellow, With a thin little twisted knee. They sat in the yellow sunlight, Out under the maple tree; And the game that...
Page 246 - Grasses run like a green sea O'er the lawn up to my knee. Under grass alone he lies, Looking up with leaden eyes, Scarlet coat and pointed gun, To the stars and to the sun. When the grass is ripe like grain, When the scythe is stoned again, When the lawn is shaven clear, Then my hole shall reappear. I shall find him, never fear, I shall find my grenadier ; But for all that 's gone and come,.
Page 22 - The mountain and the squirrel Had a quarrel, And the former called the latter 'Little Prig; Bun replied, 'You are doubtless very big; But all sorts of things and weather Must be taken in together, To make up a year And a sphere. And I think it no disgrace To occupy my place. If I'm not so large as you, You are not so small as I, And not half so spry. I'll not deny you make A very pretty squirrel track; Talents differ; all is well and wisely put; If I cannot carry forests on my back, Neither can you...
Page 248 - I cried for her more than a week, dears, But I never could find where she lay. I found my poor little doll, dears, As I played...
Page 248 - I once had a sweet little doll, dears, The prettiest doll in the world; Her cheeks were so red and so white, dears, And her hair was so charmingly curled. But I lost my poor little doll, dears, As I played in the...
Page 140 - And he found her with his Three. Then she covered her face with her fingers, That were wrinkled and white and wee, And she guessed where the boy was hiding, With a One and a Two and a Three. And they never had stirred from their places Right under the maple tree — This old, old, old, old lady And the boy with the lame little knee — This dear, dear, dear, old lady And the boy who was half-past three. HC BUNNER.

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