First Lessons in the Principles of Cooking ...

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Macmillan, 1886 - Cookery - 101 pages
 

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Page 21 - How far this may be concerned in the frequently ungovernable conduct of our over-fed convicts may be deserving of consideration. A nation of animal feeders, says Liebig, is always a nation of hunters, for the use of a rich nitrogenous diet demands an expenditure of power, and a large amount of physical exertion, as is seen in the restless disposition of all the carnivora of our menageries.
Page 27 - ... power of associating mineral elements and forming them into food. Within our own bodies there is no faculty for such conversion ; our province is to pull down what the vegetable has built up, and to let loose the affinities which the plant has brought into bondage, and thus to restore to inanimate nature the matter and force which the growing plant had taken from it.
Page 51 - ... an hour or more. But if soup be wanted, the heating should go on to boiling point, and maintained there, in order that the gelatine may be extracted to solidify the soup. It should be carefully observed that the minced meat should be put into cold water for a time, never into boiling water at first. The leanest meat is the best for soup-making ; the least particle of fat is out of place in broth or soups, and indeed renders it absolutely unwholesome as well as nauseous. Bones which require long...
Page 86 - ... her position by giving a few languid orders to her servants, which they obey or not, according to their several dispositions. By all means let her confine herself to this feeble style of housekeeping until she knows how the things should be done, for until then it is better she should not interfere. If everything was exactly as it should be, if cooks knew not only how to lay and light fires, but to cook exquisitely, it would be very delightful, and we might all live happy ever after. But, unfortunately,...
Page 87 - ... duties — or such portion of their duties as they are ignorant of — should be performed. Explanation is a good deal better than scolding, and the practical knowledge from which such explanations should spring is quite compatible with the utmost refinement and cultivation of the mind. I don't want ladies to do the servants' work; I only want them to have the opportunity of learning to explain how such work should be performed, and to understand, even in theory, why and wherefore certain causes...
Page 5 - PART I. INTRODUCTORY. THE day has come in English social history when it is absolutely the bounden duty of every person at the head of a household — whether that household be large or small, rich or poor — to see that no waste is permitted in the preparation of food for the use of the family under his or her care.
Page 70 - ... as food. The juices are kept in the meat, and instead of being called upon to consume an insipid mass of indigestible fibres, we have a tender piece of meat, from which, when cut, the imprisoned juices run freely. If the meat be allowed to remain in the boiling water without the addition of any cold to it, it becomes in a short time altogether cooked, but it will be as hard as iron, and utterly indigestible, and therefore unwholesome. If soup is to be made out of meat, then it stands to reason...
Page 7 - American sheep and oxen shall dangle in English shops. Believe me, that time is a long way off, and even when it does come there will be many more thousands of hungry mouths to be filled, so that the supply will only keep pace — even then rather lagging behind, as it does now — with the demand of the coming years. If fuel and food cost nearly twice as much at present as they did ten years ago, then surely it becomes our imperative duty to see how we can, each of us, according to our possibilities,...
Page 80 - ... and knack. Don't over-beat your eggs, just whisk them up (three are quite enough for a manageable omelet), whites and all, lightly and swiftly, beat in with them a pinch of salt, a little pepper, some finelychopped parsley, or a teaspoonful of grated cheese, or shredded bacon, or even shredded fish ; almost anything mixes well in an omelet, provided it is cut fine enough. Have the frying-pan ready on the fire with butter enough in it to fairly cover its surface when melted, which it should do...
Page 65 - ... is the secret why boys of fourteen or fifteen years old scarcely ever look anything but thin and pinched. The general remark is, " Oh, they are growing so fast ! " So they are, and that is the exact reason why their food should be particularly nourishing, more so than at any other time of their lives. Instead of that, an F.nglish schoolboy gets two slops and only one nourishing meal a day, during the years of his life when he requires the greatest amount of nutritive food.

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