First principles of soil fertility

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Orange Judd company, 1908 - Fertilizers - 263 pages
 

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Page 268 - The Forage and Fiber Crops in America By THOMAS F. HUNT. This book is exactly what its title indicates. It is indispensable to the farmer, student and teacher who wishes all the latest and most important information on the subject of forage and fiber crops. Like its famous companion, "The Cereals in America...
Page 268 - The Cereals in America," by the same author, it treats of the cultivation and improvement of every one of the forage and fiber crops. With this book in hand, you have the latest and most up-to-date information available.
Page 187 - The production possible from a definite amount of plant -food can be secured only when the conditions are such as to permit its proper solution, distribution and retention by the soil. The fact that fertilizers may now be easily secured, and the ease of application, have encouraged a careless use, rather than a thoughtful expenditure, of an equivalent amount of money or energy in the proper preparation of the soil.
Page 268 - If you raise five acres of any kind of grain you cannot afford to be without this book. It is in every way the best book on the subject that has ever been written. It treats of the cultivation and improvement of every grain crop raised in America in a thoroughly practical and accurate manner. The...
Page 221 - Furthermore, the mineral elements are relatively cheap, while the nitrogen is relatively expensive, and thus that the economical use of this expensive element, nitrogen, is dependent to a large degree upon the abundance of the mineral elements In the soil. It is therefore advocated that for all crops and for all soils that are in a good state of cultivation, a reasonable excess of phosphoric acid and potash...
Page 241 - One will seek to know what the different forms of plant-food are, what they do, from what sources they can be obtained, and how he can use them to best advantage. He will become to some extent an investigator, and will, of necessity, take a deeper interest in his work.
Page 267 - Insects Injurious to Vegetables By Dr. FH CHITTENDEN, of the United States Department of Agriculture. A complete, practical work giving descriptions of the more important insects attacking vegetables of all kinds with simple and inexpensive remedies to check and destroy them, together with timely suggestions to prevent their recurrence. A ready reference book for truckers, marketgardeners, farmers as well as others who grow vegetables in...
Page 225 - When such crops as corn, cabbage, grass, potatoes, etc., have a luxuriant, healthful growth, an abundance of potash in the soil is indicated ; also, when fleshy fruits of fine flavor and texture can be successfully grown. (e). When a soil produces good, early maturing crops of grain, with plump and heavy kernels, phosphoric acid will not generally be found deficient in the soil. Such general indications may often be most helpful, and crops should be studied carefully with these facts in mind.

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