First report on the noxious, beneficial and other insects, of the state of New York: made to the State Agricultural Society, pursuant to an appropriation for this puropse from the legislature of the state ...

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C. Van Benthuysen, printer, 1855 - Beneficial insects - 180 pages
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Page 42 - Dr. Fitch errs as to the length of' its duration; and I have also erred in the same direction, unless, indeed, there is a still greater range than my subsequent observations would...
Page 35 - This- statement must have been overlooked by Dr. Fitch, who many years afterwards, in his first report as State Entomologist of New York, p. 739 (35), in writing of the oyster-shell bark louse of the apple, states that " these scales are the relics of the bodies of the gravid females, covering and protecting their eggs.
Page 30 - June and fore part of July that the beetle frequents the trees for the purpose of depositing its eggs in the bark, it is probable that whitewashing the trunk and large limbs, or rubbing them over with soft soap, early in June, will secure them from molestation from this enemy. And in districts where...
Page 25 - But when the worm approaches maturity and has become more strong and robust, it gnaws into the more solid heart-wood, forming a flattish, and not a cylindrical hole such as is formed by most other borers — the burrow which it excavates being twice as broad as it is high, the height measuring the tenth of an inch or slightly over. It is the latter part of summer when these worms thus sink themselves into the solid...
Page 26 - CHALCIDIDJE—the female of which has the instinct to discover these borers, probably in the earlier periods of their life when they are lying directly beneath the bark, and piercing through the bark with her ovipositor, and puncturing the skin of the borer, drops her eggs therein, which subsequently hatch and subsist upon the borer, eventually destroying it. These minute...
Page 40 - A fourth brood, and which has been the oftenest and most fully noticed of any, reaches from Pennsylvania and Maryland to South Carolina and Georgia, and, what appears to be a detached branch of it, occurs also in the southeastern part of Massachusetts.
Page 176 - ... short cylindrical with rounded ends, their length scarcely more than double their breadth; legs straw yellow, faintly tinged with dusky towards their tips; wings hyaline, faintly tinged with dusky. It is probable that those flies which come out the latter part of July deposit a second crop of eggs in the gooseberries, or else resort to some other fruit of a similar nature, and that the larvae which come from these eggs lie in the ground during the winter; for we do not perceive how, otherwise,...
Page 6 - A short description of this species was published in my catalogue of the Homopterous Insects, in the State Cabinet of Natural History, under the name of Eriosoma Pyri. All those Plant lice which were formerly included in Dr. Leach's genus Eriosoma., which have all the veins of the wings simple, and those in the disk of the hind pair two in number, now form the genus Pemphigus of Hartig (Germar's Zeitsch. vol. iii, p. 366), to which genus it is therefore necessary to refer this insect* Several of...
Page 71 - ... cobweb-like thread, half an inch long, or less, and places a little oval egg at its summit. Thus a small round spot resembling mildew is formed upon the surface of the leaf, from the middle of which arises a very slender glossy white thread, which is sometimes split at its base, thus giving it a more secure attachment than it would have if single.
Page 174 - ... green, of the same hue as the cabbage leaf. Some are of a deeper tinge and others paler, varying to greenish yellow or pale yellow. Often the hind part of the body is paler than the fore part. Frequently the head or the apical segment or both are pale yellow, the rest of the body being of the usual green hue. Individuals may sometimes be met with having the head dusky or black with dusky clouds. The neck is frequently tinged with red. Commonly a stripe along the middle of the back is more or...

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