First Steps to Thorough Bass: In Twelve Familiar Lessons Between a Teacher and Pupil

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O. Ditson, 1854 - Continuo - 108 pages
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Page 35 - I don't exactly promise that; but the art of composition may be much simplified, when it is recollected that "all melodies have the perfect concords of the key they are in for their fundamental basses.
Page 3 - ... obedient, humble servants !" Lest the author should complain that we have not allowed her to speak for herself, we quote a passage from her preface ; and •we do so the more cheerfully, because we quite agree with its sentiments as to some of the chief difficulties which beset the student of music. " My object has been to make my language as plain, as simple, and as intelligible as possible. I have carefully avoided all technical phraseology ; and 1 have even, in many instances, indulged in...
Page 4 - I of the simplicity to whiqh it is possible to reduce the theory of this science, that I venture to assert, if its professors would agree amongst themselves to be content to appropriate one single name to each individual thing of which they treat, its principles would not only be more generally understood, but its practice, by which I mean chiefly the art of composition, would be very essentially improved.
Page 3 - ... efficacy by positive experience. The first six of the following lessons are exactly the same in substance, and nearly the same in language, as some I have held with two young persons. The last six may, perhaps, require the understanding to be rather more advanced, though I am willing to hope that they will not be found difficult to be understood, at almost any age, by a child in any degree capable of reflection. The progress made by those who have already learned thorough bass in this manner...
Page 4 - ... rules of thorough bass are formed, without reference to any particular instrument for their application ; so that a child, with a pencil and ruler, can put the theory of all the rules I have laid down to immediate proof. Their subsequent practice is, however, absolutely necessary, not only for the purpose of giving a readiness and facility in playing chords, but, likewise, that the ear may be early educated to harmony, and both the taste and judgment thereby improved : for this purpose, I^trongly...
Page 4 - My object has been to exemplify in generals the principles on which the rules of thorough bass are formed, without reference to any particular instrument for their application ; so that a child, with a pencil and ruler, can put the theory of all the rules I have laid down to immediate proof.
Page 3 - I have be*n urged to communicate my method of teaching it, to the public, by many good judges who have witnessed its effects with surprise; and though I acknowledge this to be an assertion as generally introduced into prefaces as the names of the publishers are inserted in titlepages, it happens, in this instance, to be literally true.
Page 35 - English, you will find, in your dictionary, that " concord " and " consonant" both mean the same thing, viz., "accord of sounds, agreeableness;" so that perfect concords are merely such chords as are formed by notes at those certain distances or intervals from each other which form the most perfectly concordant or united sound.
Page 3 - ... readers. My only wish is to inform those who are supposed to be entirely ignorant of the subject ; and if I succeed in my endeavours in smoothing its intricacies to one juvenile student, or in facilitating to an affectionate mother the delightful task of improving the minds of her young offspring, I shall feel sincerer pleasure than I could experience in extorting praise from the sternest critic. I am sensible that this little tract is not only 1819.
Page 11 - Because it is still the foundation of the harmony. Sometimes it is played both in the bass and in the treble; but it is always to be found somewhere in every chord, and is the groundwork of the whole; just the same as, in the picture books of " Little Henry " and " Little Fanny," it iy always the same little child at the bottom, though its dress and accompaniments change very often.

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