First Truths: And the Origin of Our Opinions, Explained: with an Enquiry Into the Sentiments of Modern Philosophers, Relative to Our Primary Ideas of Things

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J. Johnson, 1780 - Metaphysics - 438 pages
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Page xviii - Those first truths which arc its object require experience and meditation to be conceived, and the judgments thence derived are the result of exercising reason,' (pv) ' The use of Reason is Reasoning;' and Common Sense is that degree of understanding in all things to which the generality of mankind are capable of attaining by the exertion of their rational faculty
Page 23 - What is not intelligence, or mind, cannot produce all the effects of intelligence, or mind; neither can a fortuitous jumble of particles of matter form a work of such order, and so regular motion, as a watch.
Page xxx - Reason," on the other hand, (we are told by the same author,) " is used by those who are most accurate in distinguishing, to signify that power of the human mind by which we draw inferences, or by which we are convinced that a relation belongs to two ideas, on account of our having found that these ideas bear certain relations to other ideas. In a word, it is that faculty which enables us, from relations or ideas that are known, to investigate such as are unknown ; and without which we never could...
Page 23 - ... is not merely arbitrary. 3. There is in me something that I call intelligence or mind ; and something which is not that intelligence or mind and which is named body ; so that each possesses properties distinct from the other. 4. What is generally said and taught by men in all ages and countries of the world is true.
Page xxxiii - Reason, as implying a faculty not marked by any other name, is used by those who are most accurate in distinguishing, to signify that power of the human mind by which we draw inferences, or by which we are convinced, that a relation belongs to two ideas, on account of our having found, that these ideas bear certain relations to other ideas.
Page xxx - British, to signify that power of the mind which perceives truth, or commands belief, not by progressive argumentation, but by an instantaneous, instinctive, and irresistible impulse ; derived neither from education nor from habit, but from nature...
Page xxxi - ... to signify that power of the human mind by which we draw inferences, or by which we are convinced that a relation belongs to two ideas, on account of our having found that these ideas bear certain relations to other ideas. In a word, it is that faculty which enables us, from relations or ideas that are known, to investigate such as are unknown ; and without which we never could proceed in the discovery of truth a single step beyond first principles or intuitive axioms."f " It is in this last...
Page xxx - ... and acting in a fimilar manner upon all, or at leaft upon a great majority of mankind, and therefore properly called c ommon fenfe.
Page xlv - IN all our reasonings from the cause to the effect, we proceed on a supposition, and a belief, that the course of nature will continue to be in time to come what we experience it to be at present, and remember it to have been in time past. This presumption of continuance is the foundation of all our...
Page xlvii - ... infers the future from the past, immediately, and without the intervention of any argument. The sea has ebbed and flowed twice every day in time past; therefore the sea will continue to ebb and flow twice every day in the time to come, - is by no means a logical deduction of a conclusion from premises. When our experience of the past...

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