Fisherman's Hope

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Open Road Media, Jan 8, 2013 - Fiction - 480 pages
1 Review
Nick Seafort returned to Earth expecting a court martial but instead he’s tapped by the Naval Academy. This is no ordinary desk job . . .
Luck has always run in both directions for Naval Commandant Nicholas Seafort. While he has managed to save the Hope Nation colony from alien attack, he and his friends have paid a heavy price. Most recently, his exploits have earned him a dignified position as an instructor at the United Nations Naval Academy. But, as Seafort suspects, trouble isn’t far behind. A return to Earth means a return to his roots, some of which he wishes would remain buried. He’s uncomfortable with fame and can’t always restrain his temper as the political machine shifts around him. But when the fishlike aliens mount an attack, Seafort is the only man Earth can count on. Now he must decide whether he has the courage and fortitude to make a terrible choice . . .
 

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Review: Fisherman's Hope (Seafort Saga #4)

User Review  - Kate - Goodreads

This is one of the better books in the Seafort series, although at times it seems a little too packed with stuff. The final section is really the best, though. Read full review

Contents

Chapter
Chapter 2
Chapter 3
Chapter 4
Chapter 5
Chapter 6
Chapter 7
October in the year of our Lord 2201
November in the year of our Lord 2201
Chapter 16
Chapter 17
Chapter 18
Chapter 19
Chapter 20
Chapter 21
January in the year of our Lord 2202

Chapter 8
Chapter 9
Chapter 10
Chapter 11
Chapter 12
Chapter 13
Chapter 14
Chapter 15
Chapter 22
Chapter 23
Chapter 24
Chapter 25
Chapter 26
Chapter 27
Copyright

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About the author (2013)

David Feintuch (1944–2006) was the author of the award-winning military science fiction Seafort Saga series, which spans Midshipman’s Hope, Challenger’s Hope, Prisoner’s Hope, Fisherman’s Hope, Voices of Hope, Patriarch’s Hope, and Children of Hope. Feintuch came to writing late, previously having worked as a lawyer and antiques dealer. In 1996, at the age of fifty, he won the John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer from the World Science Fiction Society. He later expanded into the fantasy genre with his Rodrigo of Caledon series, including The Still and The King.     

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