Five Books Of Miriam: A Woman's Commentary on the Torah

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Harper Collins, Dec 29, 1997 - Religion - 384 pages
Weaving together Jewish lore, the voices of Jewish foremothers, Yiddish fable, midrash and stories of her own imagining, Ellen Frankel has created in this book a breathtakingly vivid exploration into what the Torah means to women. Here are Miriam, Esther, Dinah, Lilith and many other women of the Torah in dialogue with Jewish daughters, mothers and grandmothers, past and present. Together these voices examine and debate every aspect of a Jewish woman's life -- work, sex, marriage, her connection to God and her place in the Jewish community and in the world. The Five Books of Miriam makes an invaluable contribution to Torah study and adds rich dimension to the ongoing conversation between Jewish women and Jewish tradition.
 

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The Five books of Miriam: a woman's commentary on the Torah

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In this wonderfully imaginative book, Frankel (The Classic Tales, Aronson, 1995), the editor-in-chief of the Jewish Publication Society, presents a chorus of women's voices--from Miriam "the problem ... Read full review

Contents

INDIVIDUXLSXND FXMILKJ
3
LionWomen
93
Women Ancestors
102
Revelation
116
The Image of God
130
Clothing 1 j
156
Sexual Boundaries
172
Separateness
184
Humor and Irony 118
228
Vows and Commitments 23
237
Strangers
242
M6MOKY 44 Devarim Eldering
247
Mindfulness 2 j 1
261
Magic andSuperstition
267
Safety Nets 2 71
286
Empowerment
292

Community 18
188
8
189
LXDMHIP 34 Bamidbar Inclusion
197
Jealousy 19 9
199
Spiritual Leadership
207
Faith 2 1 j 38 Korakh Rebellion
220
Miriams Well
224
Ethical Wills
298
epiLocue
304
o j Women in the Torah 338
309
Selected Bibliography 142
342
Index
347
Copyright

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About the author (1997)


Ellen Frankel is an acclaimed storyteller and writer, popular lecturer and accomplished scholar. She is the author of many books, including The Classic Tales: Four Thousand Years of Jewish Lore.

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