Flexibility in International Negotiation and Mediation, Volume 542

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Daniel Druckman, Christopher Mitchell
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About the author (1995)

Daniel Druckman is a 2004-2005 visiting Professor at the University of Queensland's Australian Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies in Brisbane, Australia. He is the Vernon M. and Minnie I. Lynch Professor of Conflict Resolution at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia, where he has coordinated the doctoral program at the Institute for Conflict Analysis and Resolution (ICAR). He is also a member of the faculty at Sabanci University in Istanbul, Turkey and has held senior positions at several consulting firms, as well as at the U.S. National Academy of Sciences. He received a Ph.D. from Northwestern University and was awarded a best-in-field prize from the American Institutes for Research for his doctoral dissertation. He has published widely (approximately 150 publications, including 12 authored or edited books) on such topics as negotiating behavior, nationalism and group identity, human performance, peacekeeping, political stability, nonverbal communication, and methodology (including simulation). He serves as a board member or associate editor for eight Journals. He received the 1995 Otto Klineberg award for Intercultural and International Relations from the Society for the Psychological Analysis of Social Issues for his work on nationalism, a Teaching Excellence award in 1998 from George Mason University, and an award for the outstanding article published in 2001 from the International Association for Conflict Management. He is the recipient of the 2003 Lifetime Achievement award from the International Association for Conflict Management.

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