Flood Tide

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Macmillan, 1918 - 356 pages
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Page 363 - In other words, it is a psychological synthesis of personal and general conditions in a new country, such as has not got into literature before. That in itself, if it were nothing else, is a precious contribution to human knowledge, and hereafter no one who wishes to know what the conditions of the Middle West were fifty years ago, or the conditions of wellnigh all America throughout its beginnings have been, can ignore this very unexampled book.
Page 364 - America, dynamic, changing, diverse, with new laws and old desires, new industries and old social rights, new people and old — this is the environment in which Mr.
Page 85 - Where oh where are the grave old seniors, where oh where are the grave old seniors, where oh where are the grave old seniors, safe now in the wide wide world; they've gone out from their alma mater, they've gone out from their alma mater, they've gone out from their alma mater, safe now in the wide wide world.
Page 16 - I left the car there and ran back the way I had come as fast as my legs would take me.
Page 363 - As you read it you realize it the memorial of a generation, of a whole order of American experiences; as you review it you perceive it an epic of such mood and make as has not been imagined before.
Page 363 - ... eastern states. They had settled in Wisconsin prior to the birth of the author, and while he was still a boy they moved west to Iowa and then to Dakota; and finally, with the pioneer restlessness which so often in the end defeated its own purpose some of them moved still farther west to California, and we are fortunate in having in this book a permanent record attractively and clear-sightedly written, of the life of those individualistic, self-reliant native farming folk, who played by far the...
Page 363 - A Son of the Middle Border' echoes the strain and struggle of a mighty human epoch of the herculean labors of men and women, pushing back the forest and the frontiers to make way for civilization. I vibrate to the romance, to its largeness, and to the rush of it all. But I respond with an especial poignance to the splendid protest against the tragedy that accompanies this conquest of the wild — the effacement of art and beauty, the obliteration of leisure and loveliness, in the blind stupor...
Page 363 - ... poignance to the splendid protest against the tragedy that accompanies this conquest of the wild — the effacement of art and beauty, the obliteration of leisure and loveliness, in the blind stupor of the weariness that fill the worker's hours and rob him of nearly all the higher joys of existence. "This book, in its wide sweep and basic truth and sharp delineation, reaches an epic significance, and will be a storehouse for history and fiction down years to come.
Page 29 - Oceanica includes all the islands of the Pacific Ocean south of the Tropic of Cancer. It consists of...
Page 361 - What delicate keen razor-like blades of humor; what clear lucid depths of pathos and understanding — what cleaving dissective strokes, cutting into the ludicrous hodge-podge of human psychology and laying bare the strata veined with blood and stupidity! — it is immortally done.

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