Florence Nightingale: The Woman and Her Legend

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Viking, 2008 - Crimean War, 1853-1856 - 646 pages
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The soldier's saviour, the standard-bearer of modern nursing, a pioneering social reformer - and much else besides - Florence Nightingale belongs to that select band of historical characters who are instantly recognisable. As the Lady with the Lamp, ministering to the wounded and dying of the Crimean War, she offers an enduring image of sentimental appeal, and one that is permanently lodged in the national consciousness. She has been honoured and admired, criticised and ridiculed. More often than not, she has been misrepresented and misunderstood.

In this remarkable book, the first major biography of Florence Nightingale in over fifty years, Mark Bostridge draws on a wealth of unpublished material, including previously unseen family papers, to throw significant new light on this extraordinary woman's life and character. By disentangling elements of myth from the reality, Bostridge has written a vivid and immensely readable account of one of the most iconic figures in modern British history.

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dear florene nightingale thank you fo r waht you have done for florene italy

Contents

Daughter of England 182054
1
The Ridiculous Name of Nightingale
3
Pop and Flo
23
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

Vera Brittain was born on 29 December 1893 in Newcastle-under-Lyme. She came from a middle class Staffordshire family, and her father was a director of the family paper business. Her only sibling was Edward, two years her junior. She left St Monica's School in Surrey in 1911, came out as a provincial debutante in her hometown of Buxton in Derbyshire, and for the next two years attended an endless round of social engagements. By 1913 she had decided to apply to Oxford - a remarkable ambition for a woman of her time. Her intellectual powers were stimulated by her brother's best friend, Roland Leighton, who had been at Uppingham School with Edward, and who was also planning to go to Oxford. Having won an exhibition to study at Somervile College, Oxford, Brittain passed the Oxford University entrance exam shortly after the outbreak of war in August 1914. Her dream of studying alongside Edward and Roland was shattered by the First World War. Edward, Roland and two other friends, Victor Richardson and Geoffrey Thurlow, all enlisted and were soon called to the Western Front. Anxious to imitate their example, Brittain - who became engaged to Roland Leighton in 1915 - left Oxford and joined a Voluntary Aid Detachment as a nurse, serving in England, Malta and France. By the end of the war, all the men in her life had been killed, and Brittain returned to Oxford. After University, she beg

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