Florence Nightingale on society and politics, philosophy, science, education and literature, Volume 5

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Wilfrid Laurier University Press, May 16, 2003 - Biography & Autobiography - 871 pages
Florence Nightingale on Society and Politics, Philosophy, Science, Education and Literature, Volume 5 in the Collected Works of Florence Nightingale, is the main source of Nightingale's work on the methodology of social science and her views on social reform. Here we see how she took her "call to service" into practice: by first learning how the laws of God's world operate, one can then determine how to intervene for good. There is material on medical statistics, the census, pauperism and Poor Law reform, the need for income security measures and better housing, on crime, gender and the family. Her comments on a new edition of The Dialogues of Plato are given, with their impact on the revision of the next edition. We see Nightingale's condemnation of Plato's "community of wives," with her stirring approval of love (even outside marriage!), marriage and the family. In this volume also her views on natural science, education and literature are reported.Nightingale was an astute behind-the-scenes political activist. Society and Politicspublishes (much of it for the first time) her correspondence with such leading political figures as Queen Victoria, W.E. Gladstone and J.S. Mill. There are notes and essays on public administration and personal observations on various members of royalty, prime ministers and ministers, and Indian viceroys. Nightingale's support of the vote for women (contrary to much in the secondary literature) is here shown. Correspondence and notes on British general elections from 1834 to 1900 is reported, with letters to and for (Liberal) political candidates and fierce condemnations of Conservatives.

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Contents

Introduction to Volume 5
1
Nightingales Quetelet
11
Social Policy Poverty Poor Law and Charity
129
Government Public Policy and Elections
279
Elections and Party Politics
329
Letters and Notes
369
Philosophy
551
Natural Science
645
Education
663
Literature
725
Classical Greek Roman and Renaissance Authors
731
Nonhuman Species Love of Nature Birds
809
Biographical Sketches
827
Chronology
834
Copyright

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About the author (2003)

Born in Florence, Italy, of wealthy parents, Florence Nightingale was a British nurse who is regarded as the founder of modern nursing practice. She was a strong proponent of hospital reform and has been the subject of more than 100 biographies and many magazine pieces. As a young woman in the early nineteenth century, she had limited opportunity for a career. But Nightingale was very intelligent, and had extraordinary organizational capacities. She probably chose to become a nurse because of her great need to serve humanity. She was trained in Germany at the Institute of Protestant Deaconesses in Kaiserswerth, which had a program for patient care training and for hospital administration. Nightingale excelled at both. As a nurse and then administrator of a barracks hospital during the Crimean War, she introduced sweeping changes in sanitary methods and discipline that dramatically reduced mortality rates. Her efforts changed British military nursing during the late nineteenth century. Following her military career, she was asked to form a training program for nurses at King's College and St. Thomas Hospital in London. The remainder of her career was devoted to nurse education and to the documentation of the first code for nursing. Her 1859 book, Notes on Nursing: What It Is and What It Is Not has been described as "one of the seminal works of the modern world." The work went through many editions and remains in print today. Using a commonsense approach and a clear basic writing style, she proposed a thorough regimen for nursing care in hospitals and homes. She also provided advice on foods for various illnesses, cleanliness, personal grooming, ventilation, and special notes about the care of children and pregnant women.

Lynn McDonald is a professor of sociology at the University of Guelph, Ontario. She is a former president of the National Action Committee on the Status of Women, Canada's largest women's organization, and a former Member of Parliament. Her Non-smokers' Health Act made Parliamentary history as a private member's bill, and made Canada a leader in the "tobacco wars." She is the author of "The Early Origins of the Social Sciences" (1993) and "The Women Founders of the Social Sciences" (1994) (both McGill-Queen's University Press) and editor of "Women Theorists on Society and Politics" (1998) (Wilfrid Laurier University Press), all of which have significant sections on Florence Nightingale.