Florida modern: residential architecture 1945-1970

Front Cover
Rizzoli, 2004 - Architecture - 271 pages
Between 1941 and 1966, Florida became host to sweeping innovations in residential architecture rivaled only by what was happening in California with the Case Study Houses. Florida Modern documents the best work of the era, from Key West to Jacksonville, documenting numerous unsung and unpublished masterpieces by such architects as Paul Rudolph, Gene Leedy, and Rufus Nims. With today's widespread resurgence of interest in "MidCentury Modernism," the houses appear as fresh and contemporary as they did over fifty years ago. Many of the houses have been preserved as they were originally built, with Saarinen chairs and Eames furniture all part of the mise-en-scène.

While these houses found their inspiration in part from the philosophies of the Bauhaus, they were quick to incorporate aspects of regional Southern architecture, using verandas, porches, and raised floors to open out to tropical vegetation, and more importantly, cooling breezes. The appeal of many of these homes is the blurring of indoors and outdoors, the connection to the natural environment, and, perhaps even more so today, the eco-conscious spirit that favored local materials and natural ventilation.
Between 1941 and 1966, Florida became host to sweeping innovations in residential architecture rivaled only by what was happening in California with the Case Study Houses. Florida Modern documents the best work of the era, from Key West to Jacksonville, documenting numerous unsung and unpublished masterpieces by such architects as Paul Rudolph, Gene Leedy, and Rufus Nims. With today's widespread resurgence of interest in "MidCentury Modernism," the houses appear as fresh and contemporary as they did over fifty years ago. Many of the houses have been preserved as they were originally built, with Saarinen chairs and Eames furniture all part of the mise-en-scène.

While these houses found their inspiration in part from the philosophies of the Bauhaus, they were quick to incorporate aspects of regional Southern architecture, using verandas, porches, and raised floors to open out to tropical vegetation, and more importantly, cooling breezes. The appeal of many of these homes is the blurring of indoors and outdoors, the connection to the natural environment, and, perhaps even more so today, the eco-conscious spirit that favored local materials and natural ventilation.

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Contents

Introduction
13
South Atlantic Coast
30
South Gulf Coast
141
Copyright

5 other sections not shown

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About the author (2004)

Jan Hochstim teaches the history of modern architecture at University of Miami. He is a practicing architect, with an office in Coral Gables, Florida. Steven Brooke is a leading architectural photographer whose previous titles include Rizzoli's Seaside Style, Napa Valley Style, and Savannah Style.

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