Folklore and Folklife: An Introduction

Front Cover
Richard M. Dorson
University of Chicago Press, 1972 - Literary Criticism - 561 pages
"This introduction to the study of folklore and folklife contains an inspiring and spirited mixture of essays, theoretical contributions, practical instructions, and pure encyclopedia articles. It is a very well put together book, written by eighteen researchers who have something to say. One can see here that it is competent educators who have come forward and are narrating. . . . All in all it is a very use-oriented handbook with attractive typography and layout."—Iorn Pio, Journal of American Folklore
 

Contents

INTRODUCTION
1
1
53
Narrative Folk Poetry W EDSON RICHMOND
85
Folk Epic FELIX J OINAS
99
Proverbs and Proverbial Expressions
117
Folk Speech W EDSON RICHMOND
145
Social Folk Custom
159
ROBERT A GEORGES
173
Log house in Green County Indiana
291
central Africa
371
Collecting Oral Literature
407
Recording Material Culture
431
Recording Traditional Music
445
Folk Atlas Mapping
479
Folk Museum J GERAINT JENKINS
497
The Cultural Geographer and Folklife
517

Folk Religion
203
Material Culture
233
Folk
253
Folk Architecture
281
CONTRIBUTORS
533
Folk Crafts
535
Folk Art HENRY GLASSIE
542

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About the author (1972)

In 1957, Richard M. Dorson replaced Stith Thompson as the head of folklore studies at Indiana University, establishing himself as a major scholar and perhaps the foremost influence in the field. Dorson is often called the father of American folklore. In addition, he is given credit for bringing about an international or cross-cultural approach to the subject. Dorson was editor of the Journal of American Folklore (1959-63), president of the American Folklore Society (1967-68), and author of numerous studies on the subject. His textbook, American Folklore (1959), which employs a historical approach, was the first comprehensive study of the subject. In it he attempted to bring about what he calls a hemispheric theory, wherein the disciplines of both folklore and history are combined, stressing the intimate bonds between the culture of the folk and the history of the American experience. It is still recognized as a classic work.

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