Following the Equator: A Journey Around the World

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The Floating Press, Jan 1, 2009 - Biography & Autobiography - 567 pages
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Following the Equator is an account by Mark Twain of his travels through the British Empire in 1895. He chose his route for opportunities to lecture on the English language and recoup his finances, impoverished due to a failed investment. He recounts and criticizes the racism, imperialism and missionary zeal he encountered on his travels - and all with his particular brand of wit.
 

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Following the Equator (National Geographic Adventure Classics)

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This 1897 title was the fifth and last of the aging Twain's travel volumes. In it he recounts a global lecture tour undertaken in 1895. You can't go wrong with Twain. Read full review

Contents

Chapter XXXVI
304
Chapter XXXVII
315
Chapter XXXVIII
325
Chapter XXXIX
334
Chapter XL
348
Chapter XLI
356
Chapter XLII
365
Chapter XLIII
372

Chapter VIII
84
Chapter IX
94
Chapter X
104
Chapter XI
109
Chapter XII
116
Chapter XIII
121
Chapter XIV
135
Chapter XV
140
Chapter XVI
146
Chapter XVII
153
Chapter XVIII
159
Chapter XIX
168
Chapter XX
176
Chapter XXI
184
Chapter XXII
193
Chapter XXIII
203
Chapter XXIV
210
Chapter XXV
218
Chapter XXVI
229
Chapter XXVIL
235
Chapter XXVIII
247
Chapter XXIX
257
Chapter XXX
264
Chapter XXXI
269
Chapter XXXII
278
Chapter XXXIII
286
Chapter XXXIV
293
Chapter XXXV
298
Chapter XLIV
384
Chapter XLV
392
Chapter XLVI
406
Chapter XLVII
419
Chapter XLVIII
432
Chapter XLIX
443
Chapter L
457
Chapter LI
466
Chapter LII
475
Chapter LIII
485
Chapter LIV
495
Chapter LV
504
Chapter LVI
514
Chapter LVII
521
Chapter LVIII
527
Chapter LIX
544
Chapter LX
559
Chapter LXI
570
Chapter LXII
584
Chapter LXIII
596
Chapter LXIV
604
Chapter LXV
615
Chapter LXVI
623
Chapter LXVII
633
Chapter LXVIII
649
Chapter LXIX
660
Conclusion
671
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About the author (2009)

Mark Twain was born Samuel L. Clemens in Florida, Missouri on November 30, 1835. He worked as a printer, and then became a steamboat pilot. He traveled throughout the West, writing humorous sketches for newspapers. In 1865, he wrote the short story, The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County, which was very well received. He then began a career as a humorous travel writer and lecturer, publishing The Innocents Abroad in 1869, Roughing It in 1872, and, Gilded Age in 1873, which was co-authored with Charles Dudley Warner. His best-known works are The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Mississippi Writing: Life on the Mississippi, and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. He died of a heart attack on April 21, 1910.

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