Risk Management Strategies: Monitoring and Surveillance

Front Cover
Frans J. M. Smulders, John Daniel Collins
Wageningen Academic Pub, 2002 - Technology & Engineering - 352 pages
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For the veterinarian, monitoring and surveillance represent the best means of ensuring sustainable animal production at a time when consumer demands reflect awareness that many of the hazards associated with food animal production can be minimised or avoided through proper management at the primary production level. Preventive medicine and quality and safety assurance programmes are primarily based on knowledge of the existing strengths and weaknesses of the clients' enterprise and their ability to enact effective intervention measures. Accordingly, the food animal veterinarian relies upon effective monitoring of current performance and herd health status both for the purpose of maximising efficiency of production and providing an assurance that the primary food product meets required health standards in terms of freedom from those agents of concern that have their origin on the farm. These agents include foodborne parasites, pathogenic bacteria, some of which display a resistance to antimicrobial agents, contaminants of environmental origin, as well as chemical and pharmaceutical residues. The more successful these hazards are addressed at the farm, the better the quality and safety of the final product and their marketing possibilities will be. Communication between the primary producer and the food processing industry that facilitates real-time exchange of information on these issues is essential for the practice of preventive medicine at the herd and flock level. Integrated food chain quality and safety control programmes, when linked to such monitoring and surveillance principles in regard to both human and animal health, represent the means of achieving sustainable food animal production on a global scale, in line with the conclusions of WTO and EU. Volume 3 of the "Food Safety Assurance and Veterinary Public Health" series addresses this collaborative approach. Leading international experts from academia, industry and governmental institutions have been identified to deal with the various aspects of this collaborative approach in monitoring and surveillance.
 

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Contents

Preface
15
Foodborne disease surveillance as a basis for policymaking
33
Foodborne zoonoses the EU zoonosis legislation and the prospects for food
53
Can computerised information systems lead to more effective surveillance
69
19
79
Spatial and temporal aspects of risk mitigation
81
Review of the monitoring and control of BSE in Europe
93
20
95
The integrated surveillance of Salmonella in Denmark and the effect
213
81
215
The public health basis for surveillance of infectious intestinal disease
239
Meat inspection and chain information as part of the Farm to Fork Approach
257
Salmonella control in Irish pig herds
273
48
276
H7 in Irish
278
Monitoring of some environmental pollutants and aflatoxin M1 in organic
286

22
106
Scrapie surveillance in Europe
111
Estimating risks from consumption of vegetable crops from landspreading
125
27
136
28
148
Risk assessment and campylobacteriosis
151
70
169
29
170
Public health consequences of use of antimicrobial agents in agriculture
173
74
183
Antimicrobial surveillance and the emergence of resistance
185
33
191
78
195
Molecular characterisation of multidrug resistant
197
44
208
Studies on management of the histamine risk in fish for human nutrition
292
53
294
Improved detection methods required for the monitoring and surveillance
299
105
305
from sample to diagnosis
307
54
310
Risk analysis of mycotoxins in milk in Emilia Romagna
321
185
339
111
340
64
345
257
346
197
349
122
350
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