Food in War Time

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W.B. Saunders Company, 1918 - Food conservation - 46 pages
 

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Page 11 - their household and poore neighbours in some shires are forced to content themselves with rye or barleie; yea and in time of dearth many with bread made eyther of beanes, peason* or otes, or of altogether and some acornes among.
Page 11 - The gentilitie commonly provide themselves sufficiently of wheat for their own tables, whylest their household and poore neighbours in some shires are
Page 8 - boiled in water and then eaten with oil flavored with garlic or Spanish pepper. One of the families investigated consisted of eight individuals, of whom two were children. The annual income was 424 francs, or $84. Of this, three cents per day per adult was spent for food and the remaining
Page 36 - Cereals. Shredded Wheat Biscuit 7.8 13 Grape-nuts 8.6 15 Force 9.4 16 Corn Flakes 11.7 20 Puffed rice 23.5 38 TABLE 4—Cost of Vegetables. White potatoes 12.9 4.0 Turnips 20.0 2.5 New beets 27.6 5.0 Onions 29.3 6.0 Spinach 30.0 3.3 Green peas 39.2 10.0
Page 11 - yea and in time of dearth many with bread made eyther of beanes, peason* or otes, or of altogether and some acornes among.
Page 41 - glucose may be used. This is found in grapes and in raisins and it is also produced in large quantities by the hydrolysis of starch and sold under the commercial name of corn syrup or Karo. This substance is entirely wholesome and may be freely employed in the place of sugar, which is scarce.
Page 16 - man's heart." He says in this volume: But while the people of our country are entirely given up as they are at present, to gross and promiscuous feeding on the dead carcasses of animals and to the untiring pursuit of wealth, it is perhaps wholly vain for a single individual to raise his voice on a subject of this kind.
Page 43 - used for milk production. 4. Eat corn bread. It saved our New England ancestors from starvation. If we eat it we can send wheat to France. Eat oatmeal. 5. Drink no alcohol. In many families 10 per cent. of the income is spent for drink, or a sum which, if spent for real food, would greatly improve the welfare of the family.
Page 27 - the metabolism is 11 per cent. higher than for the adult of the same size and shape, or 44 calories per square meter of body surface (unpublished work of DuBois). These results explain the large appetites of boys. Women show a metabolism which is 7 per cent. lower than that of men, or 37 calories per hour per square meter of surface.
Page 10 - bread at one meal or more a day. Indian corn saved our New England ancestors from starvation, and we can in part substitute it for our wheat and send the latter abroad to spare others from starvation. The simplest elements of patriotism demand that we do this. Therefore let us cry, " Eat corn bread and save the wheat for France, the home of Lafayette!

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