Food in War Time

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W.B. Saunders Company, 1918 - Food conservation - 46 pages
 

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Page 20 - It may be roughly estimated that about 24 per cent, of the energy of grain is recovered for human consumption in pork, about 18 per cent, in milk and only about 3.5 per cent, in beef and mutton. In other words, the farmer who feeds bread grains to his stock is burning up 75 to 97 per cent. of them in order to produce for us a small residue of roast pig, and so is diminishing the total stock of human food.
Page 7 - polenta," or is mixed with beans and oil, or is made into corn bread. Cabbage or the leaves of beets are boiled in water and then eaten with oil flavored with garlic or Spanish pepper. One of the families investigated consisted of eight individuals, of whom two were children. The annual income was 424 francs or $84. Of this three cents per day per adult was spent for food and the remaining three fifths of a cent was spent for other purposes.
Page 21 - ... is the great competitor of man for the higher grades of food and in swine husbandry as ordinarily conducted we are in danger of paying too much for our roast pig. Cattle and sheep, on the other hand, although less efficient as converters, can utilize products which man can not use and save some of their potential value as human food. From this point of view, as well as on account of the importance of milk to infants and invalids, the high economy of food production by the dairy cow deserves careful...
Page 43 - In conclusion, let us agree if we can to the following propositions : 1. Eat corn bread and save the wheat for France, the home of Lafayette, and for our other allies. 2. Let no family (of five persons) buy meat until it has bought three quarts of milk. 3. Save the cream and butter and eat vegetable oils and oleomargarine. 4. Eat meat sparingly, rich and poor, laborer and indolent alike. 5. If fat, grow thin. 6. Be a prohibitionist for the period of the war (if you have enough resolution). 7. Save...
Page 19 - It is well, however, to remember that its use has been excessive and unnecessary, and its price can be cut by wholesale voluntary abstinence. The British people have suffered no hardship in the recent reduction of their meat ration. A British Commission has reported to Parliament that it takes three times as much fodder to produce beef as it does to produce milk or pork of the same food value. Since cows eat chiefly hay and grass and pigs eat grain the cost of the production of a unit value of milk...
Page 20 - In other words, the farmer who feeds bread grains to his stock is burning up 75 to 97 per cent, of them in order to produce for us a small residue of roast pig, and so is diminishing the total stock of human food. . . . The task of the stock feeder must be to utilize through his skill and knowledge the inedible products of the farm and factory, such as hay, corn stalks, straw, bran, brewers...
Page 20 - ... for the two- It would save food for milk production if steers were eaten as veal and not fed up into beef cattle- If all heifers were developed into milch cows and no cow capable of giving milk in quantity were slaughtered, the country would be placed on a much better basis than at present. It would make beef expensive, but there is every reason why it should be expensive. It would increase the dairy business, which is evidently a need of the times, something for the protection of the welfare...
Page 15 - Ibs. of potatoes daily with some vegetable margarine during a period of nearly three hundred days. The rule was to eat only when hungry and then the potatoes could be taken at the rate of an ounce a minute. During the last three months (95 days) of the experiment severe mechanical work was performed and the total food intake for the latter period amounted to 770 Ibs. of potatoes and 48 Ibs.
Page 12 - ... in greater quantity, and the diminution of the use of butter and cream. Cream is bought only by the wealthy, but in sufficient volume to largely reduce the amount of whole milk available. In Germany before the war 15 per cent, of the milk supply of that country was used for the production of cream. Regarding the use of butter a Swiss professor, himself an expert in nutrition, complains that whereas in his youth children were never given butter on their bread for breakfast, not even when there...
Page 8 - America, but it may strike some as astonishing that a race so nourished should have become the man power in the construction of our railways, our subways and our great buildings. Dr. McCollum will tell you that the secret of it all lies in the green leaves. The quality of the protein in corn is poor but the protein in the leaves supplements that of corn so that a good result is obtained. Olive oil when taken alone is a poor fat in a nutritive sense, but when taken with green leaves these furnish...

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