Food Investigation: Report of the Federal Trade Commission on Canned Foods : General Report and Canned Vegetables and Fruits, May 15, 1918, Volume 1

Front Cover
U.S. Government Printing Office, 1918 - Canned foods - 103 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 1 - Commission, within the scope of its powers, to investigate and report the facts relating to the production, ownership, manufacture, storage, and distribution of foodstuffs and the products or by-products arising from or in connection with their preparation and manufacture; to ascertain the facts bearing on...
Page vii - The PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES. SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of...
Page 91 - Rule 6, which read as follows : The licensee, in selling food commodities, shall keep such commodities moving to the consumer in as direct a line as practicable and without unreasonable delay. Resales within the same trade without reasonable justification, especially if tending to result in a higher market price to the retailer or consumer, will be dealt with as an unfair practice.
Page 1 - ... to ascertain the facts bearing on alleged violations of the antitrust acts, and particularly upon the question whether there are manipulations, controls, trust, combinations, conspiracies, or restraints of trade out of harmony with the law or the public interest * * *. The meatpacker investigation constituted a major segment of this project.
Page 2 - ... packers have shown abnormally high costs and, while charging high prices, have not made unusually high profits. The small size of the usual canning establishment and the little capital needed for an undertaking, together with the lack of localization in the industry, have placed great difficulties in the way of centralization of control, and up to this time few very effective combinations have existed. The desire of the producer to place some check upon competition and to control prices, however,...
Page 18 - The general sales agent may and does use a corresponding broker or sub' broker for sale to be made at a distance from his vicinity, but he receives the commission or brokerage, and pays the sub-brokers whom he, not the packer, hires.1 There are, generally speaking, three reasons why a packer will employ a general sales agent. First, he may consider him the quickest and most efficient means of marketing his pack. Although he usually has to pay a general sales agent a higher rate of remuneration 'than...
Page 62 - pro rata contract" has been developed, so that if the pack is smaller in amount than the number of futures sold, the canner is obligated to deliver all that he packed, and each customer is supposed to receive the same percentage of his order as every other customer. As a matter of fact, the canner usually overestimates his pack of some particular grade and is forced to make a percentage...
Page 62 - ... of which careful statistical analysis is necessary. As early as the winter, or even the fall, the canner contracts with the growers for a certain acreage of vegetables or a certain number of orchards. The canner's contract entitles him to receive the entire crop from this acreage at a certain fixed price. But growers are often very lax in their deliveries when the market for their produce is rising. The canner sells futures to the wholesale grocer against this acreage early in the year. Later,...
Page 18 - ... sales agencies are the presidents of the canneries sold for. Two of the largest selling agencies in the canned salmon trade, who sell for two of the largest packers of salmon, are so closely connected with the organization they represent that it is hard to distinguish the packers from the distributors. Such general sales agencies are practically selling departments of the packing organizations and have all the functions which brokers, independent sales agencies or even commission merchants have....
Page 20 - ... expensive vegetables and fruits bring higher rates of brokerage than the cheaper lines. The brokerage paid on peas is usually higher than for corn and tomatoes; the rate on fruits is higher than on vegetables but lower than on fish. The opposite might be expected, inasmuch as a low rate on an expensive line may mean as much profit for the broker as a high rate on a cheaper line. However, it is somewhat more difficult to market the more expensive goods, and the risks assumed are naturally greater.

Bibliographic information