Food Problems: To Illustrate the Meaning of Food Waste and what May be Accomplished by Economy and Intelligent Substitution...

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Page 78 - As to the white bread, if you buy from a baker, order it a day in advance; then he will not bake beyond his needs. Cut the loaf on the table and only as required. Use stale bread for toast and cooking. MEAT.— Use more poultry, rabbits, and especially fish and sea food in place of beef, mutton, and pork.
Page 79 - Buy less ; cook no more than necessary ; serve smaller portions. Use local and seasonable supplies. Patronize your local producers and lessen the need of transportation. Preach and practice the "gospel of the clean plate." We do not ask the American people to starve themselves. Eat plenty, but wisely, and without waste. Do not limit the plain food of growing children. Do not eat between meals. Watch out for the waste in the community. You can yourself devise other methods of saving to the ends we...
Page 79 - Fats (butter, lard, etc.) — Dairy butter has food values vital to children. Therefore, use it on the table as usual, especially for children. Use as little as possible in cooking. Reduce the use of fried foods to reduce the consumption of lard and other fats. Use vegetable oils, as olive and cottonseed oil. Save daily one-third of an ounce of animal fat. Waste no soap; it contains fat and the glycerine necessary for explosives. You can make scrubbing soap at home, and, in some localities, you can...
Page 79 - ... poultry, rabbits, and especially fish and sea food in place of beef, mutton, and pork. Do not use either beef, mutton, or pork more than once daily, and then serve smaller portions. Use all left-over meat cold or in made dishes. Use soups more freely. Use beans; they have nearly the same food value as meat. Milk. — Use all of the milk, waste no part of it. The children must have whole milk; therefore, use less cream. There is a great waste of food by not using all skim and sour milk. Sour milk...
Page 77 - FAT. Butter and cream. Lard, suet, and other cooking fats. Salt pork and bacon. Table and salad oils.
Page 79 - GENERAL SUGGESTIONS. Buy less ; cook no more than necessary ; serve smaller portions. Use local and seasonable supplies. Patronize your local producers and lessen the need of transportation. Preach and practice the "gospel of the clean plate.
Page 79 - ... only as required. Use stale bread for toast and cooking. MEAT. — Use more poultry, rabbits, and especially fish and sea food in place of beef, mutton, and pork. Do not use either beef, mutton or pork more than once daily, and then serve smaller portions. Use all leftover meat cold or in made dishes. Use soups more freely. Use beans; they have nearly the same food value as meat.
Page vi - Arithmetic is fighting the war. It is only through arithmetic that the officials of the United States Food Administration know how much food there is, how much food needs to be saved, and how much is being saved. Through the use of arithmetic in solving these problems children will be impressed as they could not be in any other way with the immense and fundamental character of the food-conservation campaign.
Page 55 - D ounces of round steak or 8 eggs. Using Saint Louis prices see which is the most economical food, and what per cent more expensive than milk the other two are. (7) Each person in the United States consumes on the average 90 pounds of sugar each year. He needs only 4/5 pound a week. How much is consumed each year that is not needed? How much could be saved if the average use of sugar by each person in this country were reduced to what he needed? (8) Our allies need 2,700,000 tons of sugar. What per...
Page 80 - Raymond, the injection should be repeated, with a dose of from 10 to 13 cc., for all these cases, at intervals of a week, until recovery. GOOD FOOD IS WASTED. If it gets into the garbage pail. If allowed to spoil in the home. If ruined by careless cooking. By careless paring and trimming. When too much is served at a meal.

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