For the Children's Hour, Book 3

Front Cover
Carolyn Sherwin Bailey
Milton Bradley Company, 1917 - Children's stories
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Contents

I
7
II
14
III
20
IV
25
V
35
VI
46
VII
56
VIII
60
XV
108
XVI
112
XVII
119
XVIII
122
XIX
128
XX
131
XXI
139
XXII
144

IX
64
X
73
XI
79
XII
85
XIII
93
XIV
100
XXIII
152
XXIV
159
XXV
168
XXVI
177
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Page 93 - LISTEN, my children, and you shall hear Of the midnight ride of Paul Revere, On the eighteenth of April, in Seventy-five ; Hardly a man is now alive Who remembers that famous day and year.
Page 119 - From the silence of sorrowful hours, The desolate mourners go, Lovingly laden with flowers, Alike for the friend and the foe ; Under the sod and the dew, Waiting the judgment day ; Under the roses, the Blue ; Under the lilies, the Gray.
Page 96 - He springs to the saddle, the bridle he turns, But lingers and gazes, till full on his sight A second lamp in the belfry burns.
Page 128 - His hair is crisp, and black, and long, His face is like the tan ; His brow is wet with honest sweat, He earns whate'er he can, And looks the whole world in the face, For he owes not any man.
Page 119 - BY the flow of the inland river, Whence the fleets of iron have fled, Where the blades of the grave-grass quiver, Asleep are the ranks of the dead; — Under the sod and the dew, Waiting the judgment day ; Under the one, the Blue; Under the other, the Gray.
Page 97 - It was twelve by the village clock When he crossed the bridge into Medford town. He heard the crowing of the cock And the barking of the farmer's dog, And felt the damp of the river fog, That rises after the sun goes down.
Page 129 - Toiling, — rejoicing, — sorrowing, Onward through life he goes ; Each morning sees some task begin, Each evening sees it close ; Something attempted, something done, Has earned a night's repose. Thanks, thanks to thee, my worthy friend, For the lesson thou hast taught ! Thus at the flaming forge of life Our fortunes must be wrought ; Thus on its sounding anvil shaped Each burning deed and thought ! ENDYMION.
Page 109 - Frietchie then, Bowed with her fourscore years and ten; Bravest of all in Frederick town, She took up the flag the men hauled down; In her attic window the staff she set, To show that one heart was loyal yet. Up the street came the rebel tread, Stonewall Jackson riding ahead. Under his slouched, hat left and right He glanced; the old flag met his sight. "Halt!
Page 97 - It was one by the village clock When he galloped into Lexington. He saw the gilded weathercock Swim in the moonlight as he passed, And the meeting-house windows, blank and bare, Gaze at him with a spectral glare, As if they already stood aghast At the bloody work they would look upon. It was two by the village clock When he came to the bridge in Concord town.
Page 99 - So through the night rode Paul Revere ; And so through the night went his cry of alarm To every Middlesex village and farm, — A cry of defiance and not of fear, A voice in the darkness, a knock at the door, And a word that shall echo...

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