Foreign Trade in Buttons

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1916 - Buttons - 184 pages
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Page 60 - Buttons made of hoof and horn under the name of horn buttons ore extensively used. Tweed clothing and fabrics in imitation of it have, through the necessity of matching their various colors, led to the importation of buttons made of celluloid and vegetable ivory. Pearl buttons have long been a leading branch. Metal buttons are not relatively so important and are not a prominent section of the trade, but they are a numerous class, including those used for uniforms and trousers and fancy buttons which...
Page 35 - C per cent. It should be noted, however, that since the publication of this report banking facilities for American exporters have been materially increased by the opening of a branch of the National City Bank of New York at Buenos Aires. All kinds of buttons are used. Styles follow those of France for women's and England for men's clothing. BRAZIL. RIO DE JANEIRO. Consul General Alfred L. Moreau Gottsehalk.
Page 2 - ADDITIONAL COPIES OF THIS PUBLICATION MAY BE PROCURED FROM THE SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUMENTS GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE WASHINGTON, DC AT 20 CENTS PER COPY CONTENTS.
Page 36 - Kic de Janeiro are so high, and the import duties comparatively so reasonable that local dealers and importers have found it more advantageous to import this type of button than to manufacture them locally from the native product. All colors are in demand, but gray, brown, and black predominate. Buttons manufactured from vegetable ivory are imported chiefly from France and Italy, and before the European war Germany also furnished a considerable quantity. In the mother-of-pearl button manufactured...
Page 104 - Firms that use foreign buttons sometimes make their purchases by importing direct, but more often by ordering through or purchasing from local jobbers and wholesalers and by ordering from local agents who carry samples only. Importers who buy regularly from abroad usually demand terms of 2 per cent monthly (leaving a clear 30 days) or 3 per cent for spot cash. BIRMINGHAM. Consul Samuel M. Taylor. Birmingham is the largest button-manufacturing center in the United Kingdom. There are about 20 firms...
Page 36 - Janeiro sell as much ns $5,000 worth of buttons monthly. Buttons of the following types are principally in demand: Wood, glass, bone, horn (very cheap), composition, mother-of-pearl, ivory, and celluloid (with springs for collar and cuff buttons). The cheapest types are sold in very large quantities in the interior of the country. Although vegetable ivory is found in considerable quantities in the Amazon district of Brazil, the freight rates from this source to...
Page 128 - The 19 12 19 13 19 14 Quantity. Value. Quantity. Value. Quantity. Value.
Page 145 - The indent agent generally arranges to pay cash against documents at port of shipment, or to have the exporter draw against documents at port of shipment at sight or 30, 60. or 90 days. Sixty-day drafts are the most general, since it gives the importer time to turn himself to better advantage, and is the general time given by the European seller. Most of the indent agents are also prepared to pay cash against documents at port of delivery, but will favor the manufacturer or exporter who concedes...
Page 29 - The clothing of the poorer claases, who constitute the bulk of the population, is so made as to require a minimum number of buttons. Moreover, patent metal fasteners or snaps have superseded buttons to a great extent on the clothing of women of all classes, except where buttons are required for purposes of decoration as well as of utility. The types of buttons imported and the materials of those most extensively used are as follows: For men's clothing: Bone, horn, and composition buttons, of cheap...
Page 35 - Davvson, jr. So far as ascertained, Argentina has no button manufactures, and imports chiefly from Germany, France, and Italy. From 1908 to 1912 the annual imports averaged $496,849 in value. In 1913 they reached $651,994, but fell to $352,457 in 1914. (The value given in these figures is that officially fixed for customs purposes, and does not represent the invoice or commercial value. It does not include buttons made of precious metals.) About 99 per cent of all buttons Imported into Argentina...

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