Forensic Aspects of Dissociative Identity Disorder

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Adah Sachs, Graeme Galton
Karnac Books, 2008 - Psychology - 215 pages
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Personality Disorder is a baffling, confusing and rather bizarre condition. Although Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID) is a formal DSM-IV diagnosis, it is still very controversial, and many professionals claim that it is extremely rare, does not exist or is fictitious. There are many reasons why professionals may be reluctant to acknowledge DID: it is, indeed, baffling, confusing and bizarre. However, there are, perhaps, other reasons for the "low popularity" of this condition.

DID, like Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), appears to be caused by trauma. But unlike PTSD, it appears to be caused by prolonged trauma, trauma which started in early childhood or infancy. Listening to accounts of people with DID is confusing due to the multiplicity of speaker(s)--it is also upsetting. The traumatic content of the stories is upsetting. The un-proved claims about terrible crimes are unsettling. We are faced with very difficult legal, ethical, moral and clinical questions, not knowing how to respond, what to believe, how to think.

This book focuses on the most unsavory aspects of DID, namely, the forensic. It explores the role of crime in the lives of people with DID: crimes committed against them, by them and crimes that they have witnessed. The various papers reflect the experiences and thoughts of a range of professionals who have worked with this group: a GP, a psychiatrist, a police officer, a lawyer, psychotherapists and counselors and, most generously, a person who has DID.
 

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This is an incredible book. It has ground breaking research on the concepts of Satanic Ritual Abuse, Extreme Abuse and Mind Control. A must read.
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list of references on SRA
http://members.aol.com/smartnews/SRA_references_list.htm
 

Contents

Introduction
1
CHAPTER
23
CHAPTER THREE
32
CHAPTER FOUR
50
CHAPTER
79
CHAPTER SEVEN
100
CHAPTER NINE
116
CHAPTER ELEVEN
140
CHAPTER THIRTEEN
155
CHAPTER FIFTEEN
185
INDEX
205
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

Adah Sachs has worked for many years as a psychotherapist in psychiatric hospitals, first at St Clements (the Royal London Hospital) and then at Huntercombe Manor, a special hospital for adolescents. She is a visiting lecturer and a training supervisor at the Centre for Child Mental Health and at the Centre for Attachment-based Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy, as well as in her private practice.

Graeme Galton was born in Australia and is an attachment-based psychoanalytic psychotherapist working in private practice and in the National Health Service. His clinical work is particularly influenced by attachment and psychodynamic theories. He is a consultant psychotherapist at the Clinic for Dissociative Studies. He also works at the Parkside Clinic in London with individuals and groups in an outpatient psychotherapy service. He teaches trainee psychotherapists at The Bowlby Centre, where he is a registered member and training supervisor.

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