Forensic Evidence: Science and the Criminal Law

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CRC Press, Aug 23, 2000 - Law - 368 pages
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Forensic Evidence: Science and the Criminal Law is a comprehensive analysis of the most recent state and federal court decisions addressing the use of forensic science in the investigation and trial of criminal cases. Each case provides a complete overview and analysis of the relevant scientific issues debated by the court in that particular case. These science-related discussions present the court's most recent positions on ballistics, blood analysis, forensic anthropology, and other scientific applications. Each case also provides a thorough examination of the legal aspects of its relevant science-related issues. These legal analyses focus on issues of criminal discovery, the debate over the legal requirements for utilization of an area of medical or other forensic science at trial, and the appellate court's acceptance in whole, in part, or not at all, of the scientist's factual findings and opinions in a wide variety of science-based settings.

The author gives special attention to the latest decisions addressing the applicability of the famous Daubert case. Here, he offers a thorough analysis of what does and does not constitute acceptable science for the basis of an expert's opinion. Against this background, Forensic Evidence: Science and the Criminal Law will aid you tremendously in discerning these intricate factors, thereby boosting your understanding and analysis of science-based criminal cases on both the federal and state levels.

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