Forging Alberta's Constitutional Framework

Front Cover
University of Alberta, 2005 - History - 538 pages
0 Reviews
Forging Alberta’s Constitutional Framework analyzes the principal events and processes that precipitated the emergence and formation of the law and legal culture of Alberta from the foundation of the Hudson’s Bay in 1670 until the eve of the centenary of the Province in 2005. The formation of Alberta’s constitution and legal institutions was by no means a simple process by which English and Canadian law was imposed upon a receptive and passive population. Challenges to authority, latent lawlessness, interaction between indigenous and settler societies, periods (pre- and post-1905) of jurisdictional confusion, and demands for individual, group, and provincial rights and recognitions are as much part of Alberta’s legal history as the heroic and mythic images of an emergent and orderly Canadian west patrolled from the outset by red coated mounted police and peopled by peaceful and law-abiding subjects of the Crown. Papers focus on the development of criminal law in the Canadian west in the nineteenth century; the Natural Resources Transfer Agreement of 1930; the National Energy Program of the 1980s; Federal-Provincial relations; and the role and responsibilities of the offices of Justices of the Peace and of the Lieutenant-Governor; and the legacies of the Lougheed and Klein governments.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

i
1
25
25
Three
61
Four
103
Five
137
165
165
Seven
191
Eight
237
Eleven
315
Twelve
345
Thirteen
391
Fourteen
411
Fifteen
459
Sixteen
479
Selected Bibliography
497
Index
517

Nine
267
289
289

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2005)

Richard Connors is Assistant Professor of History at the University of Ottawa.

John Law is Professor of Law at the University of Alberta.

Bibliographic information