Forgotten Fatherland: The search for Elisabeth Nietzsche

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A&C Black, Mar 7, 2013 - History - 256 pages
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In 1886 Elisabeth Nietzsche, Friedrich's bigoted, imperious sister, founded a 'racially pure' colony in Paraguay together with a band of blond-haired fellow Germans. Over a century later, Ben Macintyre sought out the survivors of Nueva Germania to discover the remains of this bizarre colony. Forgotten Fatherland vividly recounts his arduous adventure locating the survivors, while also tracing the colorful history of Elisabeth's return to Europe, where she inspired the mythical cult of her brother's philosophy and later became a mentor to Hitler. Brilliantly researched and mordantly funny, this is an illuminating portrait of a forgotten people and of a woman whose deep influence on the twentieth century can only now be fully understood.
 

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Forgotten fatherland: the search for Elisabeth Nietzsche

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In 1886, Nietzsche's sister, Elisabeth, together with her husband, Bernhard Foerster, and 14 German families, founded a colony in Paraguay that they christened "Nueva Germania.'' Their purpose was to ... Read full review

Contents

Asunción Docks Paraguay 15 March 1886
1
Terra Incognita
7
Up the Creek
25
The White Lady and New Germany
58
Knights and Devils
96
Elisabeth in Llamaland
136
Will to Power
170
Mother of the Fatherland
201
Nueva Germania March 1991
230
Notes
249
List of Illustrations
273
201
280
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About the author (2013)

Ben Macintyre is a columnist and Associate Editor on The Times. He has worked as the newspaper's correspondent in New York, Paris and Washington. He is the author of nine books including Agent Zigzag, shortlisted for the Costa Biography Award and the Galaxy British Book Award for Biography of the Year 2008, the number 1 bestseller Operation Mincemeat and, most recently, the Richard & Judy Book Club selection, Double Cross. He lives in London with his wife and three children.

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