Forgotten Traditions of Ancient Chinese Medicine

Front Cover
Paradigm Publications, 1998 - Medical - 403 pages
A window into the mind of a brilliant Chinese scholar-physician.
 

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Contents

Prolegomena
1
Chinese Text and Translation
49
On the Possibility of Determining a Patients Death
86
On Contradictions between the Movement in the Vessels
93
On Illnesses That Do Not Lead to Death Even Though
124
On the Causation of Illness by DemonSpirits
130
On Blood Spitting That Does Not Result in Death
137
Prescriptions
146
On the Loss of the Tradition in Needling and Cauterization
244
On the Needling Pattern in Case of Water Illnesses
250
On the Need to Produce Extraordinary Therapies in Order to Master Unusual Illnesses
254
On Slow and Quick Treatments of Illnesses
256
On Combined and Separate Treatments of Illnesses
260
On the Need to Avoid Parching Drugs When Inducing Perspiration
262
On Reasons Not to Carelessly Induce Perspiration
266
On the Difficulties in Treating Harm Caused by Wind
269

On Increasing and Reducing the Number of Drugs in Ancient Prescriptions
150
On the Composition of Prescriptions in Ancient Times and Today
154
On SingleSubstance Prescriptions
157
On Prescriptions That Are Kept Secret
160
On the Dosage of Prescriptions in Antiquity and Today
163
On Situations where a Mistaken Therapy with Drugs Does Not Result in Immediate Death
166
On Herbal Drugs and Minerals with Identical Nature and Different Functions
169
On Coercive Medication
172
On the Modification of Drugs
175
On Ginseng
177
On Parallels in the Use of Drugs and the Use of Soldiers
183
On Grasping a Specific Prescription to Treat Specific Illnesses
187
On the Inadequacy of Decoctions to Completely Cure Illnesses
190
On Ancient and Contemporary Materia Medica
193
On Changes in the Qualities of Drugs
197
On Special Strength in the Qualities of Drugs
200
On the Patterns of Drug Boiling
202
On Patterns of Drug Intake
206
On the Need for Physicians to Prepare Drugs by Themselves
209
On Prescriptions Revealed through Divinatory Practices
213
On the Fact that the Most Violent Harm Caused to Man by a Mistaken Pharmaceutical Treatment Originates from Drugs with Hot Nature
216
On Thin Ointments
218
On Attempts to Imitate Ancient Prescriptions and to Cheat People
222
Therapeutic Patterns
225
On the Calendrical Movement and Changing Influences Governing the Heavens
228
On Similarities between the Ways of Medicine and the Ways of Government
233
On the Need for Different Therapies in the Five Cardinal Regions
237
On Parallels between the Emergence of Illnesses and the Changing Condition of States
240
On the Simultaneous Application of Attacking and Supplementing and of Cold and Hot Drugs
272
On the Meaning of the Statement When You Approach a Patient Ask For His Preferences
276
On Situations Where There Is No Need to Worry about the Patients Condition When Treating an Illness
279
On the Impossibility of Curing Deepseated Illnesses with Superficial Drugs
282
On Specific Time Periods Required by Illness to Heal
284
On the Need to Examine Ones Success When Treating a Sick Person
289
On Protective Measures Against Illnesses That Are Still Insignificant
292
On the Need to Know a Patients Pathoconditions before Treating His Illness
295
On the Possibility of Special Arrangements in the Application of Supplementing Drugs
298
On Curing Illnesses with Light Drugs
300
On IntraAbdominal Abscesses
303
On Drugs that Encircle
307
Medical Literature and Disciplines
309
On the Nanching
311
On the Shanghan Luri
314
On the Chinkuei Yaolueh
317
On the Maiching
320
On the Chien Chin Fang and the Wai Tai Piyao
324
On the Huojen Shu
327
On the Taisu Mai Fa
329
On Gynecology
332
On the Speciality of Pox Medicine
336
The Doctrine of Pox Planting
338
On Pediatrics
341
On the Four Great Masters
357
On the Fact that Not Everyone is Suited to Study Medicine
371
On Patients
385
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