Forlorn River

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HarperPaperbacks, Mar 1, 1992 - Fiction - 288 pages
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Ben Ide is a failure in the horse trade because he loves horses more than money. A few bad deals have turned the world against him. His greatest adversary is his father, who thinks Ben good for nothing. Determined to show what he is made of and what he can do, Ben pursues a herd of wild horses. The herd leads him directly into danger: cattle thieves with connections in high places. Distrusted by the woman he loves, menaced by killers, and hounded by slander, Ben finds his day of reckoning at the edge of Forlorn River. What he does next will make him an outcast or a hero.

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About the author (1992)

Zane Grey was born Pearl Zane Gray in 1872, in Zanesville, Ohio. He studied dentistry at the University of Pennsylvania, married Lina Elise Roth in 1905, then moved his family west where he began to write novels. The author of 86 books, he is today considered the father of the Western genre, with its heady romances and mysterious outlaws. Riders of the Purple Sage (1912) brought Grey his greatest popular acclaim. Other notable titles include The Light of Western Stars (1914) and The Vanishing American (1925). An extremely prolific writer, he often completed three novels a year, while his publisher would issue only one at a time. Twenty-five of his novels were published posthumously. His last, The Reef Girl, was published in 1977. Zane Grey died in Altadena, California, in 1939.

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