Formal Specification and Design

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Cambridge University Press, Nov 10, 2005 - Computers - 352 pages
Formal specification is a method for precisely modelling computer-based systems that combines concepts from software engineering and mathematical logic. In this book the authors describe algebraic and state-based specification techniques from the unified view of the Common Object-oriented Language for Design, COLD, a wide-spectrum language in the tradition of VDM and Z. The kernel language is explained in detail, with many examples, including: set representation, a display device, an INGRES-like database system, and a line editor. Fundamental techniques such as initial algebra semantics, loose semantics, partial functions, hiding, sharing, predicate and dynamic logic, abstraction functions, representation of invariants and black-box correctness are also presented. More advanced ideas, for example Horn logic, and large systems are given in the final part. Appendices contain full details of the language's syntax and a specification library. Techniques for software development and design are emphasised throughout, so the book will be an excellent choice for courses in these areas.
 

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It was okey but alot of this stuff is super hard to understand and is not explained very well.

Contents

1 Introducing the basic concepts
3
2 Setting up algebraic specifications
33
3 Structuring algebraic specifications
59
4 Implementing algebraic specifications
79
II Statebased specification
111
5 From algebras to states
113
6 Setting up statebased specifications
143
7 Structuring statebased specifications
171
III Advanced techniques
241
9 Theoretical topics
243
10 Additional language constructs
263
11 Towards large systems
287
Bibliography
303
A Syntax
309
B Standard library
317
Index
332

8 Implementing statebased specifications
199

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