Fortunate Sons: The 120 Chinese Boys Who Came to America, Went to School, and Revolutionized an Ancient Civilization

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W. W. Norton & Company, Feb 14, 2011 - History - 336 pages
1 Review

"With its surging storyline, extraordinary events, and depth of character, this gripping tale of 120 Chinese boys sent to America…reads more like a novel than an obscure slice of history." —Publishers Weekly, starred review

In 1872, China—ravaged by poverty, population growth, and aggressive European armies—sent 120 boys to America to learn the secrets of Western innovation. They studied at New England’s finest schools and were driven by a desire for progress and reform. When anti-Chinese fervor forced them back home, the young men had to overcome a suspicious imperial court and a country deeply resistant to change in technology and culture. Fortunate Sons tells a remarkable story, weaving together the dramas of personal lives with the fascinating tale of a nation’s endeavor to become a world power.

 

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User Review  - pbjwelch - LibraryThing

Because I have read a lot of Chinese history (for more than 30 years), I have a fairly good background in Chinese history so I found this book at times both boring and occasionally surprisingly ... Read full review

FORTUNATE SONS: The 120 Chinese Boys Who Came to America, Went to School, and Revolutionized an Ancient Civilization

User Review  - Jane Doe - Kirkus

Desperate to modernize in the final days of empire, China launches a bold educational experiment.By the second half of the 19th century, the Qing dynasty ruled half-a-billion Chinese, with 40,000 ... Read full review

Contents

Introduction
9
The Freshman
15
The Qing
27
The Foreigners
53
SelfStrengthening
71
5
93
8
171
9
192
10
223
Epilogue
279
A Note on Sources
285
Notes
291
Index
305
7
311
253
318
Copyright

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About the author (2011)

Liel Leibovitz is a senior writer for Tablet magazine and teaches at New York University. He is the coauthor of Fortunate Sons, Lili Marlene, and The Chosen Peoples. He lives in New York City.

Matthew Milleris the co-author of Lili Marlene: The Soldiers’ Song of World War II. He lives in New York.

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