Forty Years a Soldier

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Putnam's sons, 1923 - Generals - 324 pages
 

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Page 148 - Chitral," says the Commander-in-Chief in India, " have added greatly to the prestige of the British arms, and will elicit the admiration of all who read this account of the gallant defence made by a small party of Her Majesty's forces, and combined with the troops of His Highness the Maharajah of Kashmir, against heavy odds when shut up in a fort in the heart of an enemy's country, many miles from succour and support.
Page 5 - But the moment there is a sign of revolt, mutiny, or treachery, of which the symptoms not unusually are a swollen head, and a tendency to incivility, it is wise to hit the Oriental straight between the eyes, and to keep on hitting him thus, till he appreciates exactly what he is, and who...
Page 87 - Kipling was a bright clever girl, and though she did not say much, saw everything very distinctly. She was the bright damsel who, when Lord Dufferin asked her why she was not dancing, replied, with a placid smile, " You see I am quite young, I am only eighteen. Perhaps when I am forty I shall get some partners.
Page 136 - ... you can get rid of him, under the civil-service law now, and directors do not try to do it. It takes so long and it takes so much effort that it is not worth while. I had an experience several years ago along that line. A friend of mine in Georgia had been appointed postmaster by his Congressman. I asked him what he was doing. He said he was going to fire a civilservice employee down in the post office because the fellow was no good. He would come to work half drunk. He said he had undertaken...
Page 28 - but I think it is only fair to tell you that I have only 500 men left in the Guides Infantry, and only 200 horses in the Guides Cavalry. You see we have been two years on end at war, without relief.
Page 128 - Chitral, and its ruler, than he would otherwise have succeeded in doing. The Mehtar was most civil, probably thinking that an MP generally sat on the right hand of the Queen of England, and was her chief adviser. Anyway, Frank records that the Mehtar asked them to dinner, and in return dined with them, and that they all played polo together. It must have been an inspiring sight, that game of polo, with Lord Curzon in the midst of it.
Page 252 - It was a curious and thrilling life on the Frontier. Imagine, for instance, playing a game of polo at Hurlingham, and then having to fight your way home through a storm of bullets. Yet this exciting finish occurred one evening in the Swat Valley. Picture yourself sitting down to dinner in Knightsbridge Barracks, every officer wearing a revolver, and the swords of all stacked in the corners of the room, yet the Guides so dined nightly in the days of Lumsden.
Page 226 - The British public, fed by sensational newspapers, were chiefly to blame for this low standard. Easy victories, against ill-armed though brave adversaries, where the enemy lost thousands and we counted our casualties by tens, or at most hundreds, became to be thought the normal proportion in the wars we waged.
Page 148 - The quite exemplary coolness, intrepidity, and energy exhibited by Captain Townshend, and the valour and -endurance displayed by all ranks in the defence of the fort at Chitral," says the Commander-in-Chief in India, " have added greatly to the prestige of the British arms, and will elicit the admiration of all who read this account of the gallant defence made by a small party of Her Majesty's forces, and combined with the troops...

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