Fostering Learner Independence: An Essential Guide for K-6 Educators

Front Cover
Corwin Press, Nov 10, 2008 - Education - 219 pages
0 Reviews
"While every teacher's goal is to help students become independent thinkers, determining exactly how to lead students toward self-sufficiency can be a challenge. This straightforward resource invites teachers to reflect on their philosophy of teaching and learning, and helps identify the key ingredients for creating a classroom that promotes student success and independence. Teachers will discover how to build on student strengths and interests and provide authentic learning experiences. The book includes checklists, examples, and tips, and shows readers how to: identify practices that hinder independence as well as those that foster student self-sufficiency; engage learners so they can contribute information about how and what they want to learn; promote development of good work habits, self-motivation, resiliency, and peer-to-peer problem solving; strengthen students' critical thinking and inquiry skills and incorporate differentiation and formative assessments."--Publisher's website.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Chapter 1 Learner Independence
1
Defining Learner Independence
2
Learner Independence Encourages SelfEsteem
6
A Habit of Mind
11
Conclusion
15
A Visit to Our Classrooms
16
Chapter 2 Structuring for Learner Independence
19
Controlling Versus Structuring for Learning
20
A Comparison of Assessments
108
The Link Between Rubrics and Independence
112
Assessment That Encourages Independence and Creativity
119
Reflect on Your Use of Rubrics
121
Conclusion
122
A Time to Reflect
123
Chapter 8 Evaluation and Analysis That Develops Independence
127
Supporting Students Through Evaluation
128

Fostering Independence Through Student Thinking
22
Interdependence Encourages Independence
25
Conclusion
28
A Visit to Our Classrooms
29
Chapter 3 Teaching That Promotes Independence
33
Implicit and Explicit Teaching
34
Constructivist Education
35
The Zone of Proximal Development
36
ProblemBased Instruction
37
Gradually Releasing Responsibility
38
Conclusion
39
A Time to Reflect
40
A Visit to Our Classrooms
41
Chapter 4 Expectations and Communication That Support Independence
45
Benefits of a WellManaged Classroom
46
Setting Expectations
48
Communicating With Students
61
Language of the Classroom
62
Peer Communication
64
Conclusion
65
A Time to Reflect
66
Chapter 5 Aligning Understandings and the Environment for Independence
71
Benefits of a WellPlanned Environment
73
An Environment That Mirrors a Teachers Understandings
75
Analyzing the Physical Environment
76
Role of the Teacher
78
Conclusion
80
A Visit to Our Classrooms
81
Chapter 6 Setting up for Independence
83
Arranging the Physical Environment
84
Small Group
87
Student Seating
88
The Freedom to Choose
89
The Teachers Desk
90
Wall Space
95
A Final Touch
97
Routines and Procedures
98
Change over Time
100
Conclusion
102
A Visit to Our Classrooms
103
Chapter 7 Assessment That Fosters Independence
107
Using Evaluation in Planning
132
Conclusion
134
A Visit to Our Classrooms
135
Chapter 9 Information That Fosters Learner Independence
139
Observations as Assessment
140
Conversations as Assessment
141
Descriptive and Evaluative
144
Feedback That Informs Instruction
145
Analyzing Student Work for Evidence of Instruction
146
Analyzing with Others
147
Conclusion
148
A Time to Reflect
149
Chapter 10 Planning to Support Independence
151
Purposeful Decisions
152
The Teaching and Learning Cycle
153
LongRange Planning
156
Daily Planning
157
Approaches Grouping and Resources
158
Conclusion
162
A Visit to Our Classrooms
163
Chapter 11 Differentiating for Independence
165
All Students Can Learn
167
Teaching Responsively Encourages Independence
170
Using a Variety of Processes and Resources to Encourage Independence
171
Go Deep Avoid Coverage
172
Students Need to Know Themselves as Learners
182
Student Choice is Critical
184
Differentiation Leads to Independent Learners
185
Conclusion
186
A Visit to Our Classrooms
187
Changing and Reflecting
195
Our Behaviors are Influenced by Thought and Perception
196
Teaching as Constant Decision Making
197
Learning Requires Engagement and Alteration in Thought
199
Humans Continue to Grow Cognitively
200
Task Analysis
203
Moving from Controlling Learning
205
Responses That Encourage Independence
207
References
209
Index
215
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2008)

Roxann Rose-Duckworth is an innovative elementary and middle school teacher, college instructor to preservice educators, and respected educational consultant. Rose-Duckworth has nearly fifteen years experience working with students in kindergarten through sixth grade in three different states. She was recognized for her creative and effective teaching strategies in 1996 when the Walt Disney Company honored her dedication to her students as one of 36 teachers chosen nationwide to be honored by Disney’s American Teacher Awards. Rose-Duckworth’s teaching was highlighted in The Creative Classroom Project, a video series by Harvard Graduate School of Education’s Project Zero (1999-2004). She has presented at national conferences for both ASCD and IRA and published articles in NCTE’s Primary Voices. In 2006, Rose-Duckworth co-authored The Teaching Experience: An Introduction to Reflective Practice (Pearson). She enjoys preparing future teachers for tomorrow’s classrooms and working with current teachers to help them reflect on and improve their teaching practices. Rose-Duckworth takes an active role in North Sound Reading Council, her local International Reading Association affiliated organization.

Karin Ramer is a reflective and respected elementary school teacher and educational consultant. She has taught kindergarten through third grade, reading recovery, Title I, and special education. Aside from teaching in the classroom, she has effectively worked as a mentor, literacy coach, and staff development facilitator at the elementary level. Her passion is teaching students and guiding educators as they reflect on best practices. Currently, Ramer works as an educational consultant in Oregon and Washington, aiming to enhance understandings about literacy and learner independence. Over the last ten years, she has presented for conferences sponsored by the Western Literacy & Reading Recovery®, The Learning Network® , and Washington Organization for Reading Development (WORD).

Bibliographic information