Foundations of American Grape Culture

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Orange Judd Company, 1909 - Grapes - 252 pages
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Page 215 - ... varieties native in a region subject to great and sudden ranges of temperature, can endure well, while those brought into such regions from where the range is small, will suffer, as is the case with grapes of Florida or New England brought into northwest Texas. Both suffer, while the vines of northwest Texas thrive well, both in Florida and New England, so far as resistance to heat and cold are concerned. In other words, northwest Texas plants have a much wider range of climatic endurance than...
Page 216 - ... Cinerea, Berlandieri, Champini, Candicans, Rupestris and Monticola thrive in such soils. We find those that chlorose badly are natives of very sandy soils, along the banks of streams and lakes — the Vulpina, or on sandhills, as is the Post-Oak grape of Texas, while those that grow best in very limey soils, belong to species native in such soils. We find, however, that in some cases varieties of species, native in very sterile soils, take on far more vigorous growth when put into soils richer...
Page 215 - The following paper was read by TV Munson : Resistance to Cold, Heat, Wet, Drought, Soils, Insects, Fungi, in Grapes. BY TV MUNSON, Denison, Texas. As a general, if not a universal, law of adaptation of plants to- environment, we find that the natives in the environment are better adapted than the exotics. The vine is no exception to this law. Let us test the assertion by comparison. What species and varieties of grapes resist winter's cold best? Certainly the vines, and vineyard varieties derived...
Page 215 - ... the native Post-Oak and Mustang grape. The Concord, that remains vigorous for fifty years in Massachusetts, its native State, survives only eight to fifteen years in Texas with equally good treatment. This brings into consideration another element of hardiness, the power to withstand great or only small range of climatic change. In this, the general law still holds good. Those species with their varieties native in a region subject to great and sudden ranges of temperature, can endure well, while...
Page 215 - ... northern limit of this species) endures — 15 to — 25, while the Florida cordifolia is sometimes killed to the ground in northern Texas with zero or a few degrees colder. V . bicolor of southern Wisconsin endures — 30 readily, while Norton Virginia, of the nearly allied species of aestivalis, finds its northern limits about Louisville and Cincinnati. So we might continue with all the species and their varieties. The limiting lines of hardiness to withstand cold do not follow the parallels...
Page 227 - ... trellis, gently coiling around the wire, one arm in one direction, the other in opposite direction, and should be of about equal lengths, so that one firm tie with jute yarn, near the ends, will be all the tying the vines will need — that is, two ties to each vine — the least required by any trellis system, and the pruning is also simplest and the results every way the best. "Some of the advantages of this trellis are its cheapness, its simplicity, bringing the work up breast high so that...
Page 224 - ... ground sufficiently to allow ventilation and diffused light enough to favor the proper development and ripening of the fruit. This wa.s the key to my invention.
Page 117 - Vite nel Caucaso (Physalospora woroninii n. sp.) Atti R. 1st. Bot. Univ. Pavia, (NS) 7: 33-47. 1900. i pi. Munson, TV Length of Life of Vines of Various Species and Varieties of Grapes : profitableness ; and by what Diseases Seriously Affected.
Page 216 - ... species have greater resistance power than others, all developed in the same climate, soil, etc. This fact is seized by the plant breeder with great avidity, to increase the hardiness of his varieties of same blood and nativity by selection, depending on the law of inheritance to sustain his selections. As to soil, the law holds good so far as resisting an excessive or injurious chemical element. For example : some varieties of grapes, the Labrusca, Lincecumii and Rotundifolia varieties, especially,...
Page 224 - Cedar, heart wood of Catalpa, Black Locust, or White Oak. The end posts of every row should be large and strong and be set three and one-half or four feet in the ground and well tamped. The intermediate posts, which may be much lighter than the end posts, should be six and one-half or seven feet long and set two to two and one-half feet in the ground, with twenty-four feet spaces between posts, which will take three vines, eight feet apart, or two vines twelve feet apart. After the posts are set,...

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