Founding Fictions

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University of Alabama Press, Apr 15, 2010 - History - 274 pages
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An extended analysis of how Americans imagined themselves as citizens between 1764 and 1845

Founding Fictions develops the concept of a “political fiction,” or a narrative that people tell about their own political theories, and analyzes how republican and democratic fictions positioned American citizens as either romantic heroes, tragic victims, or ironic partisans. By re-telling the stories that Americans have told themselves about citizenship, Mercieca highlights an important contradiction in American political theory and practice: that national stability and active citizen participation are perceived as fundamentally at odds.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Political Fictions as Critical Tools for Citizenship
9
Citizens as Romantic Heroes 17641776
42
Citizens as Tragic Victims 17831789
83
Citizens as Reified Patriot Heroes July 4 1826
120
Citizens as Ironic Partisans 18161845
147
Conclusion
202
Notes
219
Index
269
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

Jennifer R. Mercieca is an associate professor of Communication at Texas A&M University.

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