Four American Pioneers: Daniel Boone, George Rogers Clark, David Crockett, Kit Carson: A Book for Young Americans

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Werner school book Company, 1900 - Indians of North America - 255 pages
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Page 55 - ... when amongst them are to be found men to censure and blast the reputation of a person so just and upright, and in whose breast is a seat of virtue too pure to admit of a thought so base and dishonorable. I have known Boone in times of old, when poverty and distress had him fast by the hand, and in these wretched circumstances, I have ever found him of a noble and generous soul, despising everything mean, and therefore I will freely grant him a discharge for whatever sums of mine he might have...
Page 69 - How carelessly he leaned upon his gun ! That sceptre of the wild, that had so often won. Those western Pioneers an impulse felt, Which their less hardy sons scarce comprehend ; Alone in Nature's wildest scenes they dwelt ; Where crag, and precipice, and torrent blend, And stretched around the wilderness, as rude As the red rovers of its solitude, Who watched their coming with a hate profound, And fought with deadly strife for every inch of ground. To shun a greater ill sought they the wild ? No,...
Page 70 - While father plowed with rifle at his back, Or sought the glutted foe through many a devious track. How cautiously, yet fearlessly, that boy Would search the forest for the wild beast's lair, And lift his rifle with a hurried joy, If chance he spied the Indian lurking there : And should they bear him prisoner from the fight, While they are sleeping, in the dead midnight, He slips the thongs that bind him to the tree, And leaving death with them, bounds home right happily. Before the mother, bursting...
Page 69 - ... in the wilderness : Oh! how he loved, alone, to hunt the deer, Alone at eve, his simple meal to dress ; No mark upon the tree, nor print, nor track, To lead him forward, or to guide him back : He roved the forest, king by main and might, And looked up to the sky and shaped his course aright. That mountain, there, that lifts its bald, high head Above the forest, was, perchance, his throne ; There has he stood and marked the woods outspread, Like a great kingdom, that was all his own ; In hunting-shirt...
Page 184 - The race is not always to the swift, nor the battle to the strong," and so it proved in the present instance. My mustang was obliged to carry weight, while his competitors were as free as nature had made them. A beautiful bay, who had trod close upon my heels the whole way, now came side by side with my mustang, and we had it hip and thigh for about ten minutes, in such style as would have delighted the heart of a true lover of the turf. I now felt an interest in the race myself, and for the credit...
Page 184 - ... our old amusement yet." And they did come on with a vengeance, clatter, clatter, clatter, as if so many fiends had broke loose. The prairie lay extended before me as far as the eye could reach, and I began to think that there would be no end to the race. My little animal was full of fire and...
Page 131 - I am too old and infirm, as you see, to ever use a sword again, but I am glad that my old mother State has not entirely forgotten me, and I thank her for the honor and you for your kindness and friendly words.
Page 176 - This was a clean new sight to me ; about a dozen big stages hung on to one machine, and to start up hill. After a good deal of fuss, we all got seated and moved slowly off, the engine wheezing as if she had the tizzick.
Page 116 - Agreed for the following reasons : the remoteness from succor ; the state and quantity of provisions, etc. ; unanimity of officers and men in its expediency ; the honorable terms allowed ; and, lastly, the confidence in a generous enemy.

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