Four Practical Revolutions in Management: Systems for Creating Unique Organizational Capability

Front Cover
CRC Press, Apr 24, 2001 - Business & Economics - 784 pages
3 Reviews
In Four Practical Revolutions in Management: Systems for Creating Unique Organizational Capability, authors Shoji Shiba and David Walden significantly revise their classic text on leading management systems -- A New American TQM. This book is a comprehensive approach to business management that goes beyond business operations improvement.

The authors demonstrate a program for establishing a sophisticated, state-of-the-art management system that creates unique organizational capabilities. Containing new methodologies and case studies, the book is one of the most extensive in the management field and provides a step-by-step program for implementing leading management techniques.

To create a successful management system, the authors argue that companies must be organized around four major areas of practice called the "four revolutions." They are customer focus, continuous improvement, total participation, and societal networking. For each of the areas, the book presents proven methods that enable dynamic implementation strategies.

Customer Focus

Any effective management system begins with the customer. Companies must learn to integrate a customer's concerns into their own. The book presents how to embrace the "market-in" concept and integrate the other skills in the book into a management strategy that focuses on the customer.

Continuous Improvement

For a company to be successful in the 21st century, it must continually improve its processes to meet the ever-changing needs of the customer. This book introduces important tools for process discovery, management, and improvement. In the process, it moves beyond "reactive improvement" methods to "proactive improvement" efforts.

Total Participation

The key to creating a dynamic management system is employee participation. Employees are the ones who work on the issues of quality and customer satisfaction on a daily basis. This book presents skills such as hoshin management, team-building, creating structures for mobilization, and leading change and breakthrough.

Societal Networking

Besides a company's internal audience, another source of business improvement ideas is societal networking. This is the set of companies, customers, and suppliers associated with any organization, that can learn from the experiences of these groups. To develop these valuable resources into a comprehensive management strategy, the book covers "mutual learning" methods, as well as keys for integrating various management methodologies.

This book includes:

  • Hoshin management
  • PDCA (plan, do, check, act) cycle
  • 7-step method of reactive improvement
  • Proactive improvement to develop new products
  • Engaging people in a changing environment
  • Focused strategies for phase-in
  • Leading process improvement
  • The practice of breakthrough
  • Over thirty thorough case studies
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

The Evolution of the Customer Satisfaction Concept
3
Survival in a Rapidly Changing World
19
Developing a Unique Organizational Capability
41
CUSTOMER FOCUS
49
Evolution of Customer Focus and Its Challenges
59
CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT
71
PART 2BMANAGING EXISTING PROCESSES
95
Process Discovery Example
103
SelfDevelopment
341
PART 3CTEAM SKILL DEVELOPMENT
361
Evolution of a Japanese QC Team
371
CrossFunctional CQM Design Team
379
Core Teams at Analog Devices
385
PART 3DORGANIZATIONAL SKILL DEVELOPMENT
405
CEO Involvement at Teradyne
410
Infrastructure for Mobilization
423

Process Control and Variation
107
Reactive Improvement and the 7 Steps Method
123
Broken Pellicle 7 Steps at Analog
133
Management Diagnosis of the 7 Steps of Reactive Improvement
149
Steps Diagnosis at Analog
163
Process Management Mobilization Case StudyTeradyne
175
PART 2CONETIME EFFORTS
183
Steps Mobilization at Teradyne
185
PART 2DFINDING NEW DIRECTIONS
199
BBN Customer Visitation Program Case Study
221
Applying Proactive Improvement to Develop New Products
235
Societal Networking for Concept Engineering Development
236
Contextual Inquiry at Digital
243
PART 3AINTRODUCTION
285
PART 3BINDIVIDUAL SKILL DEVELOPMENT
297
Societal Networking via CQM Study Group on Conversation
299
Coordinating Behavior in Gary Burchills Management Team
323
Leading Change
329
SerVend Example of Goals Values and Mission
429
Monitoring Improvement Teams at Teradyne
445
PhaseIn
453
U S Focused Strategies for PhaseIn
467
Benchmarking from Xerox
468
Six Sigma from Motorola
477
PART 3EORGANIZATIONAL UNIQUENESS
503
Leading Process Improvement
547
Further Case Studies in Mobilization
577
The Practice of Breakthrough
607
SOCIETAL NETWORKING
643
Ongoing Integration of Methods
675
Afterword
699
About the Authors
705
CQM Study Group on CycleTime Reduction 484
722
Index
729
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

Bibliographic information