Four Years in the Saddle

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Harper & Brothers, 1866 - United States - 291 pages
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Page 180 - I felt more like weeping over Chambersburg, although the people covered me with reproaches, which all who know me will readily believe I felt hard to digest ; yet my pity was highly excited in behalf of these poor unfortunates, who were made to suffer for acts perpetrated by the officers of their own Government. The day was bright and intensely hot. The conflagration seemed to spring from one vast building. Dense clouds of smoke rose to the zenith, and hovered over the dark plain. At night it would...
Page 162 - I also furnished the bnggage-master with a guard, telling him to deliver to each. passenger their property, and to unload the train. The engineer had made his escape, or I should have run up to Havre de Grace, and made an effort to burn all the bridges, and likewise the large steamer there. Being informed that General Franklin was on board, I went into the car pointed out to me, and asked some officers who were in it which was General Franklin. No reply.
Page 158 - Early'a whole force was now up, and would attack in the morning. We were not to engage in this, however, but were ordered to strike for Westminster, Cockeysville, and the Northern Central railroad. After a heavy march, the brigade halted at New Windsor, and I was ordered to take twenty men on fresh horses, gallop to Westminster, and cut the telegraph. It was near sunset when we approached, and there learned there were one hundred and fifty men in the town. Trusting to their supposing we were well...
Page 180 - ... the officers of their own Government. The day was bright and intensely hot. The conflagration seemed to spring from one vast building. Dense clouds of smoke rose to the zenith, and hovered over the dark plain. At night it would have been a grand but terrible object to behold. How piteous the sight of those beautiful green meadows — groups of women and children exposed to the rays of a burning sun, hovering over the few articles they had saved, most of them wringing their hands, and with wild...
Page 181 - General McCausland," says Gilmor, "ordered a levy upon this place of $30,000, which was so out of all reason th'it we Marylanders remonstrated, but to no purpose. He told the principal men of the place that unless the money was paid he would burn the town. To this I and all my men objected, saying that too much Maryland blood had been shed in defence of the South for her towns to be laid under contribution or burned. I perceived, too, that his men were inclined to plunder. After a consultation with...
Page 131 - When within 400 yards, the infantry rose and opened upon them. Major Ship halted, and ordered them to fix bayonets, which they did, under a terrible fire. While doing this, Major Ship was knocked down by a piece of shell, and lay for a moment breathless, but almost immediately was on his feet again, and calling out to the cadets, "Follow my lead, boys...
Page 100 - Treading on a pile of dry corn-husks that lay in our way, the sergeant pricked up his ears and stooped down to look under the glare of light. I saw that he discovered us, and forthwith fired upon him and then charged the camp. The cry was, " Surrender or be killed !" and the yelling and firing were quite lively. I must do them the justice to say that they fought desperately, firing from their blankets as they lay behind their shelters, and it was with difficulty that any could be secured. We set...
Page 160 - My mother, father, and sisters, and three of my brothers, were there, and under no little excitement. I captured the whole party on the front steps when I rode up, and — if I except some, perhaps, just complaint of my rather severe hugging — treated them with kindness, and, upon detainment for a few hours, paroled and released them, and moved on with my command.
Page 100 - Up to this time we hud taken about fifteen prisoners, and several were killed *nd wounded. The fires around the house shone brightly, and the soldiers within could see every one of us distinctly. Three of our men were shot. To finish the business, we charged the house, hoping to take all prisoners, but the door was barricaded and could not be forced. My cousin Willie was by my side nearly all the time. A bullet struck his right arm, and knocked the pistol from his hand. He cried out, " Major, I'm...
Page 163 - Finding I could not run the train up to Havre de Grace, I burned it, and prepared to catch that which had left Baltimore forty minutes after this one. I had also sent a flag of truce to the drawbridge, where were two hundred infantry and the gun-boat Juniata, sent to protect it, demanding a surrender, and was about ordering some sharpshooters to push them a little, when the second train of twelve passenger cars came up and was easily captured. The engineer of this also escaped, but I took the engine...

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