Framing the West: Race, Gender, and the Photographic Frontier in the Pacific Northwest

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Oxford University Press, Oct 30, 2003 - Photography - 232 pages
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Framing the West argues that photography was intrinsic to British territorial expansion and settlement on the northwest coast. Williams shows how male and female settlers used photography to establish control over the territory and its indigenous inhabitants, as well as how native peoples eventually turned the technology to their own purposes. Photographs of the region were used to stimulate British immigration and entrepreneuralism, and imagies of babies and children were designed to advertise the population growth of the settlers. Although Indians were taken by Anglos to document their "disappearing" traditions and to show the success of missionary activities, many Indians proved receptive to photography and turned posing for the white man's camera to their own advantage. This book will appeal to those interested in the history of the West, imperialism, gender, photography, and First Nations/Native America. Framing the West was the winner of the Norris and Carol Hundley Prize of the Pacific Coast Branch of the American Historical Association.
 

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Contents

The Natural Habitat of the Anglo Saxon upon the Pacific Ocean
32
An Outpost of the Empire Welcomes You
50
She Was the Means of Leading into the Light
85
Of Moral Qualities That Would Render Them an Ornament to Their Sex
108
Indigenous Uses of Photography
138
Conclusion
170
NOTES
177
INDEX
210
Copyright

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Page 27 - Formerly, the image illustrated the text (made it clearer); today, the text loads the image, burdening it with a culture, a moral, an imagination.
Page 30 - ... hand, the press photograph is an object that has been worked on, chosen, composed, constructed, treated according to professional, aesthetic or ideological norms which are so many factors of connotation ; while on the other, this same photograph is not only perceived, received, it is read, connected more or less consciously by the public that consumes it to a traditional stock of signs.
Page 17 - The object of the work is to promote accurate anthropological observation on the part of travellers, and to enable those who are not anthropologists themselves to supply the information which is wanted for the scientific study of anthropology at home.
Page 30 - ... such a photograph remains surrounded by the meaning from which it was severed. A mechanical device, the camera has been used as an instrument to contribute to a living memory. The photograph is a memento from a life being lived. The contemporary public photograph usually presents an event, a seized set of appearances, which has nothing to do with us, its readers, or with the original meaning of the event. It offers information, but information severed from all lived experience.
Page 17 - NOTES AND QUERIES ON ANTHROPOLOGY, OR A GUIDE TO ANTHROPOLOGICAL RESEARCH FOR THE USE OF TRAVELLERS AND OTHERS.

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