François Blondel: Architecture, Erudition, and the Scientific Revolution

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Routledge, Dec 6, 2012 - Architecture - 326 pages

First director of the Académie royale d’architecture, François Blondel established a lasting model for architectural education that helped transform a still largely medieval profession into the one we recognize today.

Most well known for his 1676 urban plan of Paris, Blondel is also celebrated as a mathematician, scientist, and scholar. Few figures are more representative of the close affinity between architecture and the "new science" of the seventeenth century.

The first full-length study in English to appear on this polymath, this book adds to the scholarship on early modern architectural history and particularly on French classicism under Louis XIV and his minister Jean-Baptiste Colbert. It studies early modern science and technology, Baroque court culture, and the development of the discipline of architecture.

 

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Contents

Introduction
1
1 Mathematician engineer courtier
8
the Académie Royale dArchitecture
41
Paris
71
4 Architects and mathematicians
118
the PerraultBlondel debate revisited
148
Blondel as reader and collector
166
Blondels Nachleben
192
Letters patent October 1659
200
Inventory of the library February 1686
206
Abbreviations
237
Notes
238
Bibliography
288
Photographic acknowledgements
313
Index
314
Copyright

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About the author (2012)

Anthony Gerbino is a historian of early modern architecture in France and England. His research focuses on the role of architecture in seventeenth-century scientific and academic circles and on the technical and mathematical background of early modern architects, engineers, and gardeners. He is an Associate Member of Worcester College at the University of Oxford and co-author of Compass and Rule: Architecture as Mathematical Practice in England 1500-1750 (Yale University Press, 2009).

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