Francesca Da Rimini: A Tragedy of Silvio Pellico

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C. W. Seaver, 1897 - 89 pages
 

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Page xl - Love, that in gentle heart is quickly learnt, Entangled him by that fair form, from me Ta'en in such cruel sort, as grieves me still : Love, that denial takes from none beloved, Caught me with pleasing him so passing well, That, as thou seest, he yet deserts me not. Love brought us to one death : Ca'ina waits The soul, who spilt our life.
Page xli - Alone we were, and no Suspicion near us. Ofttimes by that reading Our eyes were drawn together, and the hue Fled from our alter'd cheek.
Page xl - No greater grief than to remember days Of joy, when misery is at hand That kens Thy learn'd instructor. Yet so eagerly If thou art bent to know the primal root, From whence our love gat being, I will do As one, who weeps and tells his tale. One day, For our delight we read of Lancelot, How him love thrall'd. Alone we were, and no Suspicion near us. Oft-times by that reading Our eyes were drawn together, and the hue Fled from our alter'd cheek. But at one point Alone we fell. When of that smile we...
Page xli - By one so deep in love, then he, who ne'er From me shall separate, at once my lips All trembling kiss'd. The book and writer both Were love's purveyors. In its leaves that day We read no more.
Page xl - Then turning, I to them my speech addressed, And thus began : " Francesca ! your sad fate Even to tears my grief and pity moves. But tell me ; in the time of your sweet sighs, By what, and how Love granted, that ye knew Your yet uncertain wishes ?" She replied : " No greater grief than to remember days Of joy, when misery is at hand.
Page xxxviii - By pity, well-nigh in amaze my mind Was lost; and I began: "Bard! willingly I would address those two together coming. Which seem so light before the wind.
Page xxxix - Our prayer to him should for thy peace arise. Since thou hast pity on our evil plight. Of whatsoe'er to hear or to discourse It pleases thee, that will we hear, of that Freely with thee discourse, while e'er the wind As now, is mute. The land that gave me birth Is situate on the coast, where Po descends To rest in ocean with his sequent streams. ' Love that in gentle heart is quickly learnt Entangled him by that fair form, from me Ta'en in such cruel sort, as grieves me still ; ' Love that denial...
Page xxxviii - Coming into the second circle of Hell, Dante at the entrance beholds Minos the Infernal Judge, by whom he is admonished to beware how he enters those regions. Here he witnesses the punishment of carnal sinners, who are tossed about ceaselessly in the dark air by the most furious winds. Among these, he meets with Francesca of Rimini, through pity at whose sad tale he falls fainting to the ground. FROM...
Page xxxix - As doves By fond desire invited, on wide wings And firm, to their sweet nest returning home, Cleave the air, wafted by their will along ; * Jnfrrno, canto vv 2B.
Page xxxix - If, for a friend, the King of all we own'd, Our prayer to Him should for thy peace arise, Since thou hast pity on our evil plight.

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