Francis Bacon: Discovery and the Art of Discourse

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Cambridge University Press, 1974 - Science - 267 pages
By modern standards Bacon's writings are striking in their range and diversity, and they are too often considered a separate specialist concerns in isolation from each other. Dr Jardine finds a unifying principle in Bacon's preoccupation with 'method', the evaluation and organisation of information as a procedure of investigation or of presentation. She shows how such an interpretation makes consistent (and often surprising) sense of the whole corpus of Bacon's writings: how the familiar but misunderstood inductive method for natural science relations to the more information strategies of argument in his historical, ethical, political and literary work. There is a substantial and valuable study of the intellectual Renaissance background from which Bacon emerged and against which he reacted. Through a series of details comparisons and contrasts we are led to appreciate the true originality and ingenuity of Bacon's own views and also to discount the more superficial resemblances between them and later developments in the philosophy of science.
 

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Lisa Jardine, skillfully draws attention to comparative arts, ethics and experimental discovery.
Written in 1974, a time where traditions in philosophy, science and culture were the
subject of critical reviews.
I wonder how framing political communication, time and gender are changing our interpretations of human nature.
 

Contents

Dialectic and method in the sixteenth
17
An English dialectical controversy
59
Bacons theory of knowledge
76
The goal of the interpretation of nature
109
Analogy and generalisation in natural
133
Analogy and generalisation in ethics
150
Methods of communication
169
Exempla
194
Bacons view of rhetoric
216
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About the author (1974)

Lisa Jardine was born in Oxford, England on April 12, 1944. She studied mathematics and English at university receiving a MA in the literary theory of translation from the University of Essex and a PhD from the University of Cambridge with a thesis on the scientific genius of Francis Bacon. She taught English at Warburg Institute, the University of Essex, Cornell University, Cambridge University, and Queen Mary and Westfield College. She wrote several books during her lifetime including Francis Bacon: Discovery and the Art of Discourse, Ingenious Pursuits, Worldly Goods, Global Interests: Renaissance Art Between East and West, and Temptation in the Archives: Essays in Golden Age Dutch Culture. Going Dutch: How England Plundered Holland's Glory won the $75,000 Cundill International Prize in History in 2009. She received a Royal Society medal for popularizing science and was appointed CBE in 2005 for her contribution and commitment to state education. She died of cancer on October 25, 2015 at the age of 71.

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