Frank Lloyd Wright and Japan: The Role of Traditional Japanese Art and Architecture in the Work of Frank Lloyd Wright

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Psychology Press, 2000 - Architecture - 244 pages
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An account of Frank Lloyd Wright's relationship with Japan and its arts. It presents information on the nature and extent of Wright's formal and philosophical debt to Japanese art and architecture. Eight primary channels of influence are examined in detail, from Japanese prints to specific individuals and publications, and the evidence of their impact on Wright is illustrated through a mixture of textual and drawn analyses. Wright's friendships and connections with key artistic figures in Chicago in the 1880s and 1890s are revealed and the impact of Japanese culture in America at that time is discussed. Philosophical influences on Wright and their effect on his creative inspiration are explored.
 

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Contents

Japanism and the Boston orientalists 9
25
the Japanese house dissected
35
the temple and the villa married
47
Penollosa and the organic nature of Japanese art
73
the picture the plan and the pattern
85
The woodblock print and the geometric abstraction
99
and its role in exemplifying several of his own organic design principles
116
Okakura and the social and aesthetic Ideals of the East
122
A Summary of events
184
Kakuzo Okakuras catalogue of the Hooden
191
E Ernest Penollosas essay on The Nature of Fine Art
198
F Frederick Gookins reviews of Kakuzo Okakuras books
207
Contents
215
Works by
222
Modern works on traditional Japanese art and aesthetic ideals
228
Illustration acknowledgements
234

analogies with Iapanese builtforms
165
the universal manifested
177

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