Frankenstein, or, The Modern Prometheus

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Oxford University Press, 1869 - 241 pages
395 Reviews
Frankenstein was published in 1818, the work of a 21-year-old genius named Mary Shelley. Hundreds of movies, adaptations, and monster masks later, its reputation remains so lively that the title has become its own word in the English language. Victor Frankenstein, a scientist, discovers the secret of reanimating the dead. After he rejects his hideous creation, not even the farthest poles of the earth will keep his bitter monster from seeking an inhuman revenge. Inspired by a uniquely Romantic view of science’s possibilities, Shelley’s masterpiece ultimately wrestles with the hidden shadows of the human mind.
 

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the book is great

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This story well deserves it status as a classic. Honestly, it doesn't read much like a horror story, but is more in line with other Romantic proto feminist literature. It reminds me very much of a Bronte novel. Those familiar with the story of Frankenstein through popular culture will be surprised at how much has been added to, or changed from the original. 

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About the author (1869)

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley was born in London in 1797, the daughter of well-known intellectuals. She married the poet Percy Bysshe Shelley in 1816 and spent much of her adulthood in continental Europe, surrounded by her friends in the English Romantic Movement. Her tumultuous life included the loss of three children in infancy and her husband’s death by drowning in 1822. Nevertheless, her contributions to English literature continue to fascinate and inspire readers and artists alike.


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