Free Verse: An Essay on Prosody

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Northwestern University Press, 1996 - Poetry - 199 pages
To make sense of "free verse" in theory or in practice, the study of prosody - the function of rhythm in poetry - must be revised and rethought. In Free Verse: An Essay on Prosody, Charles Hartman develops a theory of prosody that includes the most characteristic forms of twentieth-century poetry.
Hartman examines nonmetrical verse, discusses the conventions that have emerged in the absence of meter, and shows how these conventions can work prosodically. By analyzing the work of Williams and Eliot - the prosodic masters among the early modernists - Hartman traces their influence on more contemporary poets. In his exploration of the means by which a poet controls the reader's temporal experience of poetry. Hartman presents an invaluable treatment of the concept of verse.
 

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Contents

Some Definitions
10
Chapter
29
Chapter Three
45
Chapter Four
61
Chapter Five
81
Chapter
106
Chapter Seven
130
Chapter Eight
144
Appendix
173
List of References
187
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About the author (1996)

Charles O. Hartman is professor of English and Poet in Residence at Connecticut College.

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