Freedom: An Introduction with Readings

Front Cover
Psychology Press, 2001 - Philosophy - 252 pages
This introduction to the arguments about individual freedom is ideal for newcomers to philosophy or political thought. Each chapter considers a fundamental argument about the scope of individual freedom, including the concepts of negative and positive freedom, freedom of belief, the Harm Principle, and freedom of speech and expression. Each argument is then clearly linked to a reading from key thinkers on each of these problems: Isaiah Berlin, Jeremy Waldron, Jonathan Wolff, Bernard Williams, Ronald Dworkin, H.L.A. Hart and Charles Taylor.
Key features include clear activities and discussion points, chapter summaries, and guides to further reading.
^Freedom will be of interest to students of philosophy, politics and critical thinking.
 

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Contents

READINGS
123
Whats wrong with negative liberty
203
Reasoning
219
Answers to exercises
235
Bibliography
249
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About the author (2001)

Nigel Warburton is lecturer in philosophy at the Open University. He is author of the bestsellers Philosophy: The Basics; Thinking from A-Z; Philosophy: The Classics; and Philosophy: The Basic Readings, all available from Routledge. >

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