Freedom: Freedom in the Making of Western Culture

Front Cover
BasicBooks, 1991 - History - 487 pages
1 Review
Argues that the concept of personal freedom developed as it did only in the Western world because of the role of women, along with slaves and foreigners, as outsiders, but that the Christian concept of spiritual freedom led to the justification of socialhierarchies

What people are saying - Write a review

Freedom in the making of western culture

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Patterson, a Harvard sociologist, argues that the idea of freedom is the supreme value in the Western world and increasingly so in the rest of the world. This book, the first of a projected two-volume ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - gmicksmith - LibraryThing

In The Classical World: An Epic History from Homer to Hadrian, Robin Lane Fox takes issue with Patterson. Read full review

Contents

The Meaning of Freedom
1
Part
7
Why Freedom Failed in
20
The Greek Origins of Freedom
47
The Emergence of Slave Society and Civic Freedom
64
The Persian Wars and the Creation of Organic
82
Slavery Empire and the Periclean Fusion
95
The Female Force and the Ideology
106
Personal Liberty
227
Sovereignal Freedom
258
Freedom Stoicism and the Roman Mind
264
Part Four
291
Between Jesus and Paul
304
A Community of Urban Freedmen
316
Paul and the Freedom of Mankind
325
Part Five
345

Class and the Elements
133
The Outer Intellectual Response
146
The Turn to Inner Freedom
165
The Intellectual Response in the Hellenistic
181
Part Three
201
Medieval Renditions of the Chord of Freedom
363
Freedom in the Religious and Secular Thought
376
Coda
402
Index
471
Copyright

Other editions - View all

About the author (1991)

Patterson is John Cowles Professor at Harvard University. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Bibliographic information