Freedom of Information: The News the Media Use

Front Cover
Peter Lang, 2008 - History - 266 pages
The Freedom of Information Act was signed into law during the last half of the twentieth century to ensure public access to government documents. In this book, Shannon E. Martin details the history that led to the law's enactment and the resulting discoveries in government repositories over the past fifty years. In light of the ongoing national security war on terror, this is a timely and historical overview of the accessibility of government-held information.
 

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Contents

Information and Government
7
Government and News Media
17
How News Media Report About Governmentheld
31
Government Housekeeping
41
The Paper Curtain
49
The Freedom of Information Act
59
Introduction
77
Federal Agencies through the Lens of FOIA
83
States and Freedom of Information
131
Introduction
151
Is Less Really More?
161
appendix a Title 5 Government Organization and Employees
171
appendix b Contact Information for FOIA Offices
189
Notes
211
Bibliography
239
Index
247

The Famous the NotSoFamous and FOIA
97
The Business of Government Consumers and FOIA
113

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About the author (2008)

The Author: Shannon E. Martin is Professor of Communication at the University of Maine. She is the author of Bits, Bytes and Big Brother: Federal Information Control in the Technological Age (1995) and Post-Vietnam Confrontations: U.S. Wars and the Media in Primary Documents (2005). She is also co-author with Kathleen A. Hansen of Newspapers of Record in a Digital Age: From Hot Type to Hot Link (1998), and co-editor with David Copeland of The Function of Newspapers in Society: A Global Perspective (2003).

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